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Hope Hart

Foresight and Advocacy Lead, Global Seeds Product Safety, Syngenta

Expert Bio

Hope Hart is the Foresight and Advocacy Lead for Global Seeds Product Safety at Syngenta. She obtained an M.S. in Microbiology at North Carolina State University in North Carolina, USA, conducting her thesis on starch metabolism in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Hope’s 18-year career at Syngenta has included identification and characterization of novel insect control traits, molecular characterization of transgenic plants for environment and human safety assessments and global regulatory submissions, and delivery of detection methods for identification and quantification of Syngenta’s transgenic events. During Hope’s tenure as a research scientist in the Insect Control Group, she discovered the gene ecry3.1Ab, the active ingredient in Syngenta’s newest corn rootworm trait Agisure Duracade.

Studies, Articles and Answers

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Showing 10 out of 11 results

Question

Q: Do Biotech companies feel they are responsible for the declining bee population? Use of pesticides are very high on GMO crops as well as mono crops not being healthy for the soil and pollinators. "The danger that the decline of bees and other pollinators

Answered By Hope Hart - May 30, 2014

A:  Thank you for allowing me to clear up some misinformation. While it’s true some commercial beekeepers have experienced problems with overwinter losses in bee colonies, the popular press has greatly exaggerated the situation by suggesting a possible “beepocalypse” or threat of extinction. Believe it or not, statistics kept by government and international bodies show honey bee populations are stable in the U.S. and Europe and dramatically rising worldwide (USDA, government of Canada and FAO). As for the European Commission, it did not ban but did restrict some uses of neonicotin [...]

Answered By Hope Hart - May 30, 2014

A:  Thank you for allowing me to clear up some misinformation. While it’s true some commercial beekeepers have experienced problems with overwinter losses in bee colonies, the popular press has greatly exaggerated the situation by suggesting a possible “beepocalypse” or threat of extinction. Believe it or not, statistics kept by government and international bodies show honey bee populations are stable in the U.S. and Europe and dramatically rising worldwide (USDA, government of Canada and FAO). As for the European Commission, it did not ban but did restrict some uses of neonicotin [...]

Environment Crop protectants

Question

Q: Do Biotech companies feel they are responsible for the declining bee population? Use of pesticides are very high on GMO crops as well as mono crops not being healthy for the soil and pollinators. "The danger that the decline of bees and other pollinators

Answered By Hope Hart - May 30, 2014

A:  Thank you for allowing me to clear up some misinformation. While it’s true some commercial beekeepers have experienced problems with overwinter losses in bee colonies, the popular press has greatly exaggerated the situation by suggesting a possible “beepocalypse” or threat of extinction. Believe it or not, statistics kept by government and international bodies show honey bee populations are stable in the U.S. and Europe and dramatically rising worldwide (USDA, government of Canada and FAO). As for the European Commission, it did not ban but did restrict some uses of neonicotin [...]

Answered By Hope Hart - May 30, 2014

A:  Thank you for allowing me to clear up some misinformation. While it’s true some commercial beekeepers have experienced problems with overwinter losses in bee colonies, the popular press has greatly exaggerated the situation by suggesting a possible “beepocalypse” or threat of extinction. Believe it or not, statistics kept by government and international bodies show honey bee populations are stable in the U.S. and Europe and dramatically rising worldwide (USDA, government of Canada and FAO). As for the European Commission, it did not ban but did restrict some uses of neonicotin [...]

Environment Crop protectants

Question

Q: What do you have to say about the millions of bees that have been dying that has been directly linked to the use of your pesticides that are sprayed in generous amounts on your gmos

Answered By Hope Hart - May 30, 2014

A: The concerns with pesticides and bees have largely focused on a special class of insecticides, known as neonicotinoids, that are used on GMO and non-GMO crops. “Neonics,” as they are often referred to, were developed to be less harmful to “non-target” pests and are most often applied as a seed coating, rather than a spray. This means much less pesticide is needed and less pesticide is distributed into the environment. In many cases, neonics have replaced older classes of pesticides, such as organophosphates and pyrethroids, which are also toxic to bees.   Perhap [...]

Answered By Hope Hart - May 30, 2014

A: The concerns with pesticides and bees have largely focused on a special class of insecticides, known as neonicotinoids, that are used on GMO and non-GMO crops. “Neonics,” as they are often referred to, were developed to be less harmful to “non-target” pests and are most often applied as a seed coating, rather than a spray. This means much less pesticide is needed and less pesticide is distributed into the environment. In many cases, neonics have replaced older classes of pesticides, such as organophosphates and pyrethroids, which are also toxic to bees.   Perhap [...]

Environment Crop protectants

Question

Q: What do you have to say about the millions of bees that have been dying that has been directly linked to the use of your pesticides that are sprayed in generous amounts on your gmos

Answered By Hope Hart - May 30, 2014

A: The concerns with pesticides and bees have largely focused on a special class of insecticides, known as neonicotinoids, that are used on GMO and non-GMO crops. “Neonics,” as they are often referred to, were developed to be less harmful to “non-target” pests and are most often applied as a seed coating, rather than a spray. This means much less pesticide is needed and less pesticide is distributed into the environment. In many cases, neonics have replaced older classes of pesticides, such as organophosphates and pyrethroids, which are also toxic to bees.   Perhap [...]

Answered By Hope Hart - May 30, 2014

A: The concerns with pesticides and bees have largely focused on a special class of insecticides, known as neonicotinoids, that are used on GMO and non-GMO crops. “Neonics,” as they are often referred to, were developed to be less harmful to “non-target” pests and are most often applied as a seed coating, rather than a spray. This means much less pesticide is needed and less pesticide is distributed into the environment. In many cases, neonics have replaced older classes of pesticides, such as organophosphates and pyrethroids, which are also toxic to bees.   Perhap [...]

Environment Crop protectants

Question

Q: what foods are gmo

Answered By Hope Hart - Sep 18, 2014

A: This might surprise you, but only eight crops from GM seeds are commercially available in the United States. These crops are corn (field and sweet), soybeans, cotton, canola, alfalfa, sugar beets, papaya and squash.  As a result, most of the products in the produce aisle of your grocery store are not GM, but 70 to 80 percent of the food on grocery store shelves likely contain processed ingredients from GM plants. Alan McHughen, biotechnology specialist and geneticist, explains, “Processed foods like sugar or vegetable oil may carry ingredients from GM crops, but the modified feature [...]

Answered By Hope Hart - Sep 18, 2014

A: This might surprise you, but only eight crops from GM seeds are commercially available in the United States. These crops are corn (field and sweet), soybeans, cotton, canola, alfalfa, sugar beets, papaya and squash.  As a result, most of the products in the produce aisle of your grocery store are not GM, but 70 to 80 percent of the food on grocery store shelves likely contain processed ingredients from GM plants. Alan McHughen, biotechnology specialist and geneticist, explains, “Processed foods like sugar or vegetable oil may carry ingredients from GM crops, but the modified feature [...]

Other

Question

Q: what foods are gmo

Answered By Hope Hart - Sep 18, 2014

A: This might surprise you, but only eight crops from GM seeds are commercially available in the United States. These crops are corn (field and sweet), soybeans, cotton, canola, alfalfa, sugar beets, papaya and squash.  As a result, most of the products in the produce aisle of your grocery store are not GM, but 70 to 80 percent of the food on grocery store shelves likely contain processed ingredients from GM plants. Alan McHughen, biotechnology specialist and geneticist, explains, “Processed foods like sugar or vegetable oil may carry ingredients from GM crops, but the modified feature [...]

Answered By Hope Hart - Sep 18, 2014

A: This might surprise you, but only eight crops from GM seeds are commercially available in the United States. These crops are corn (field and sweet), soybeans, cotton, canola, alfalfa, sugar beets, papaya and squash.  As a result, most of the products in the produce aisle of your grocery store are not GM, but 70 to 80 percent of the food on grocery store shelves likely contain processed ingredients from GM plants. Alan McHughen, biotechnology specialist and geneticist, explains, “Processed foods like sugar or vegetable oil may carry ingredients from GM crops, but the modified feature [...]

Other

Question

Q: what does GMO stand for?

Answered By Hope Hart - May 27, 2014

A: “GMO” stands for genetically modified organism. GMOs are used for a variety of purposes, such as to produce human insulin, vitamins, vaccines or enzymes used in cheeses, fermented beverages and starch products. GMO Answers is  focused on GM crops for plant agriculture.  Currently, eight crops are commercially available from GM seeds in the United States: corn, soybeans, cotton, canola, alfalfa, sugar beets, papaya and squash.     If you’re interested in learning more about how GM plants are created, check out the video below.     Alan McHughen, biotechnology specialist and geneticist, expla [...]

Answered By Hope Hart - May 27, 2014

A: “GMO” stands for genetically modified organism. GMOs are used for a variety of purposes, such as to produce human insulin, vitamins, vaccines or enzymes used in cheeses, fermented beverages and starch products. GMO Answers is  focused on GM crops for plant agriculture.  Currently, eight crops are commercially available from GM seeds in the United States: corn, soybeans, cotton, canola, alfalfa, sugar beets, papaya and squash.     If you’re interested in learning more about how GM plants are created, check out the video below.     Alan McHughen, biotechnology specialist and geneticist, expla [...]

Business Practices GMOs & Farmers

Question

Q: what does GMO stand for?

Answered By Hope Hart - May 27, 2014

A: “GMO” stands for genetically modified organism. GMOs are used for a variety of purposes, such as to produce human insulin, vitamins, vaccines or enzymes used in cheeses, fermented beverages and starch products. GMO Answers is  focused on GM crops for plant agriculture.  Currently, eight crops are commercially available from GM seeds in the United States: corn, soybeans, cotton, canola, alfalfa, sugar beets, papaya and squash.     If you’re interested in learning more about how GM plants are created, check out the video below.     Alan McHughen, biotechnology specialist and geneticist, expla [...]

Answered By Hope Hart - May 27, 2014

A: “GMO” stands for genetically modified organism. GMOs are used for a variety of purposes, such as to produce human insulin, vitamins, vaccines or enzymes used in cheeses, fermented beverages and starch products. GMO Answers is  focused on GM crops for plant agriculture.  Currently, eight crops are commercially available from GM seeds in the United States: corn, soybeans, cotton, canola, alfalfa, sugar beets, papaya and squash.     If you’re interested in learning more about how GM plants are created, check out the video below.     Alan McHughen, biotechnology specialist and geneticist, expla [...]

Business Practices GMOs & Farmers

Question

Q: why were GMO corn made?

Answered By Hope Hart - Jan 23, 2015

A: Farmers need every tool available to them to increase crop production using limited natural resources to meet the growing demand for food, feed, fiber and fuel as the global population rises. Plant biotechnology can improve crop productivity and yields, and improve the quality of crops, while reducing the environmental impact of their production, making them more sustainable.  Further, biotechnology is helping improve nutrition and other consumer-desired characteristics in some crops, and improving certain manufacturing processes in others.    Even with modern crop protectio [...]

Other

Question

Q: You know GMOs are bad yet you continue like its perfectly safe, do you not care about the consumers?

Answered By Hope Hart - Jul 10, 2015

A: Biotech crops have been tested and consumed globally for many years. They are as safe as conventional crops and their economic and environmental benefits have proven to be superior. They are not a single solution “silver bullet” for meeting our agricultural needs, but they are certainly important tools for addressing the challenge of supporting a growing global population and are critical to the sustainability of agriculture so that future generations can meet their needs. As such, these crops are very important for consumers.   GE food and feed products are the most extens [...]

Answered By Hope Hart - Jul 10, 2015

A: Biotech crops have been tested and consumed globally for many years. They are as safe as conventional crops and their economic and environmental benefits have proven to be superior. They are not a single solution “silver bullet” for meeting our agricultural needs, but they are certainly important tools for addressing the challenge of supporting a growing global population and are critical to the sustainability of agriculture so that future generations can meet their needs. As such, these crops are very important for consumers.   GE food and feed products are the most extens [...]