QWhat do you have to say about the millions of bees that have been dying that has been directly linked to the use of your pesticides that are sprayed in generous amounts on your gmos

What do you have to say about the millions of bees that have been dying that has been directly linked to the use of your pesticides that are sprayed in generous amounts on your gmos

AExpert Answer

The concerns with pesticides and bees have largely focused on a special class of insecticides, known as neonicotinoids, that are used on GMO and non-GMO crops. “Neonics,” as they are often referred to, were developed to be less harmful to “non-target” pests and are most often applied as a seed coating, rather than a spray. This means much less pesticide is needed and less pesticide is distributed into the environment. In many cases, neonics have replaced older classes of pesticides, such as organophosphates and pyrethroids, which are also toxic to bees.

 

Perhaps the best illustration of neonics and GMOs in action is in the canola fields that cover millions of acres of prime farmland in Western Canada. Most of this canola is GMO and heavily reliant on neonics to control particular insects. Yet bees are thriving in neonic-treated canola fields. Beekeepers actually bring their bees into the fields because foraging on canola helps bees make such fine honey.

 

Bee health is an issue, but USDA has been clear that by far the biggest threat to bee health is the epidemic infestation of the Varroa destructor mite. Other issues, such as the lack of diverse habitats and the many diseases bees are subject to, are also big problems. As for pesticides, the focus is increasingly on other types, including the miticides beekeepers themselves use inside the hive to try to kill the Varroa mites.

 

The real-world evidence, along with several large-scale field studies, all demonstrate that neonics used in seed treatments do not pose a widespread threat to bee health.

Posted on March 2, 2018
Believe it or not, I jump at opportunities to talk about aquatic life, so thank you for your interest. I developed a passion for aquatic animals early on and remain grateful that I have managed to explore my passions in ecotoxicology for over 25 years! This is a very general question in terms of pesticide/herbicide options that are commercially available and as well as applications. I will focus on glyphosate and dicamba specifically. Two active ingredients in herbicidal formulations that... Read More
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Posted on March 2, 2018
Believe it or not, I jump at opportunities to talk about aquatic life, so thank you for your interest. I developed a passion for aquatic animals early on and remain grateful that I have managed to explore my passions in ecotoxicology for over 25 years! This discussion will focus on glyphosate and dicamba as examples of herbicides that are used to manage weed control on farms cultivating GM crops. As background, glyphosate binds strongly to soils limiting bioavailability and glyphosate rapidly... Read More
Answer:
Posted on March 2, 2018
Believe it or not, I jump at opportunities to talk about aquatic life, so thank you for your interest. I developed a passion for aquatic animals early on and remain grateful that I have managed to explore my passions in ecotoxicology for over 25 years! Many different short-term and long-term aquatic studies are required for pesticides during the registration process and these studies are used to evaluate if there are potential impacts to aquatic life. These required studies test for potential... Read More
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