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Posted on May 3, 2017
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By Phillips McDougall’s calculations, 777 million tonnes of the top biotech food crops (maize, soybean, canola and sugar beet) were produced in 2015, which equates to 48.6 percent of the global production of these crops. Since you do not eat cotton, this number was not included. It’s also important to keep in mind that a proportion of all of the crops will be for feed and fuel purposes, not as direct food.   If you want to look at total impact of biotech crops on crop... Read More
Posted on April 24, 2017
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There are two possible questions here: 1) what is Roundup Ready® corn, and 2) is it fed to dairy cows? I’d like to answer both.   Q1 - What is Roundup Ready® corn? Roundup is a brand name (trademark) for agricultural herbicides. Monsanto’s Roundup® branded agricultural herbicides contain glyphosate, a non-selective herbicide, as an active ingredient. Glyphosate inhibits a specific enzyme that is essential to plant growth. When the product is sprayed on plant... Read More
Posted on April 24, 2017
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The GM crops cultivated globally in 2016 are corn, soybean, cotton, canola, sugar beet, squash, potato, poplar, alfalfa, Brinjal. But there are more if we count by traits or events (e.g. herbicide tolerant corn, insect resistant corn, staked gene (with both traits) etc.)   GM salmon was approved in the U.S. in 2015 and in Canada in 2016. Malaysia imports GM corn and soybean for food and feed. Most of the food ingredients from these two crops might be GM as well since segregation of GM... Read More
Posted on April 25, 2017
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GMOs can have impact on the environment in many ways by improving soil health and air quality, reducing food waste & loss and preserving H20.   This article by Graham Brookes, Agricultural Economist, explores some of the economic and environmental impacts of GM crop use.   “‘In the 17th year of widespread adoption, crops developed through genetic modification delivered more environmentally friendly farming practices while providing clear improvements to farmer... Read More
Posted on April 21, 2017
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In short, yes, GMOs are real. Nearly all foods today have been genetically modified or altered in some way over thousands of years through selective breeding. There are only nine commercially available GMO crops in the U.S: soybeans, corn (field and sweet), canola, cotton, alfalfa, sugar beets, summer squash, papaya and potatoes. GMO apples have also been approved to be grown and will be coming to market soon.   The chart below explains why each of the nine GMO crops – which are... Read More
Posted on April 21, 2017
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As I have stated in this previous answer, GE-crops and non-GE crops are not inherently different in terms of risk. Hence, if GE-crops were not regulated (just as non-GE crops are basically not regulated), the risks would be the same as the risks of not regulating non-GE crops.   What have been the risks of not regulating non-GE crops?   Scientific plant breeding goes back to the early 1900s with the expanding knowledge of biology and genetics, particularly Medelian genetics. Crop... Read More
Posted on April 21, 2017
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Subpart A: Are GMOs inherently more risky than nonGMOs?   No – GMOs are not inherently more risky that non-GMOs, The answer “No” is unequivocal. To support my answer, I provide brief quotations:   “Crops modified by molecular and cellular methods should pose risks no different from those modified by classical genetic methods for similar traits. As the molecular methods are more specific, users of these methods will be more certain about the traits they... Read More
Posted on April 21, 2017
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To answer your question, foods made from GM crops are as healthy as their non-GM counterparts. In this response, registered dietician, Connie Diekman, explains:   “…the Food and Drug Administration has set forth guidelines related to the use of GMOs, and in those documents they reference the science that indicates food developed through biotechnology are digested in the same manner as other foods and therefore provide the same nutrition, or in some cases more nutrition (if... Read More
Posted on April 20, 2017
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To date, no verifiable reports of negative impacts have been found from the cultivation or consumption of GM products. An important reason for the safety of GMOs is that they are extensively tested before commercialization.   This response by Dr. Laura Privalle, Global Head Regulatory Field Study Coordination at Bayer, on the safety research that has taken place on GMOs:   “Prior to commercialization every GMO product is subjected to an extensive safety assessment which is... Read More
Posted on April 20, 2017
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Many people have misconceptions and questions about GMOs, leading them to believe many myths.   Farm Babe Michelle Miller, outlined some of the top myths about GMOs and debunks these in one of her blog posts.   “Myth #1: Farmers are forced to grow GMOs.   No, we aren’t forced to. No, the government doesn’t pay us to. We grow them because we want to and they help us, you, and the planet. Since the inception of certain GMO crops, insecticide spray is down... Read More