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There is actually a great deal of genetic diversity among the hybrids and varieties that have also had a gene added by genetic engineering. Once an engineered version of the plant is developed, it goes back into the regular breeding system which is used to develop lines that are adapted to different soils and climates. Now from a pest evolution perspective it isn’t wise to depend on only one Bt gene for insect resistance or one gene for tolerance to one herbicide. That...

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I am not aware of any genetically modified corn resistant to Anthracnose leaf blight. So, nothing to ban. And for the second part, this disease is common throughout the Midwest, but most corn hybrids (whether GM or not) already have some natural genetic resistance bred into them. The combination of genetic resistance, crop rotation, and spraying fungicides means anthracnose is not typically a problem.

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Thank you for your question. We’ve compiled a [no-lexicon]variety[/no-lexicon] of responses from a few of our experts discussing pesticides, the environment and GMOs which we hope will answer your question. ...

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There is currently no GMO honey commercially available today. However, nearly all foods today have been genetically modified or altered in some way over thousands of years through selective breeding. Although, there are only 10 commercially available GMO crops in the U.S: soybeans, corn (field and sweet), canola, cotton, alfalfa, sugar beets, summer squash, papaya, potatoes and apples. These 10 are the only GMO crops that are commercially available in the U.S., but it is also important to...

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A GMO plant can be made to produce different chemicals. At the initial level the products of added genes are proteins, but proteins can also function as enzymes i.e., they cause chemical reactions and these chemicals can affect growth. ...

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Some companies do voluntarily have statements that products have ingredients sourced from crops grown from genetically engineered seeds. Some examples are statements like, “Produced with genetic engineering” or “Partially Produced with Genetic Engineering” that appear under the list of ingredients. 

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Herbicide cost per acre depends on a wide number of variables including (but not limited to) weed species present, farm location, timing of application, crop seeding rate, competitiveness of crop, herbicides used, length of growing season in that location, etc. ...

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Thank you for your question, and for clarity purposes, I want to mention there are multiple products under the Roundup® brand, so I am going to assume you are inquiring about Roundup Agricultural herbicides. With that said, you can get Roundup in bulk format from almost any ag retailer in the U.S. There are several thousand in the U.S. If the ag retailer near you does not carry Roundup brand glyphosate then please request it. 

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Genetic engineering (GE) touches on the routine life of billions of people (but not everyone). Food, clothes, and medicine are commonly made with the help of genetically engineered organisms. Certain medicines, like insulin, could only be mass-produced this way. Fiber for clothes is made less expensive thanks to GE cotton plants. You also PROBABLY sometimes eat plants with a few engineered genes, depending on where you live. But genetic engineering isn’t just for making new or better...

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