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Some companies do voluntarily have statements that products have ingredients sourced from crops grown from genetically engineered seeds. Some examples are statements like, “Produced with genetic engineering” or “Partially Produced with Genetic Engineering” that appear under the list of ingredients. 

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Herbicide cost per acre depends on a wide number of variables including (but not limited to) weed species present, farm location, timing of application, crop seeding rate, competitiveness of crop, herbicides used, length of growing season in that location, etc. ...

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Thank you for your question, and for clarity purposes, I want to mention there are multiple products under the Roundup® brand, so I am going to assume you are inquiring about Roundup Agricultural herbicides. With that said, you can get Roundup in bulk format from almost any ag retailer in the U.S. There are several thousand in the U.S. If the ag retailer near you does not carry Roundup brand glyphosate then please request it. 

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Genetic engineering (GE) touches on the routine life of billions of people (but not everyone). Food, clothes, and medicine are commonly made with the help of genetically engineered organisms. Certain medicines, like insulin, could only be mass-produced this way. Fiber for clothes is made less expensive thanks to GE cotton plants. You also PROBABLY sometimes eat plants with a few engineered genes, depending on where you live. But genetic engineering isn’t just for making new or better...

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Thanks for the question. I believe you are asking about how corn hybrids are produced. For starters, corn plants have both female (silks and cobs) and male parts (tassels). This means that in a field of corn, any plant can fertilize any other plant (hybrid), including itself (inbred).   ...

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Before the advent of genetically engineering plants for resistance to bacteria and viruses, farmers used chemicals - lots and lots of chemicals - to control pathogenic bacteria and the insects that transmit the plant viruses. ...

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This is an important question! Of course scientists wouldn't want to release any plants or products that would be harmful to humans. The first part of the answer is that I'm not aware of ANY examples of released GMOs hurting human bodies. In fact, GMO (or genetically engineered, GE) crops have actually helped both plants and human health, by making harvests more efficient and reducing the need to spray harmful pesticides. Safety to humans is an important part of the...

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Yes, but only on purpose. Folks may have seen ornamental plants that have red or purple foliage. It is possible to copy this natural phenomenon into other plants using GMO technology. Other than that, the simple act of making a plant a GMO should not change its color.  

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