QDo Biotech companies feel they are responsible for the declining bee population? Use of pesticides are very high on GMO crops as well as mono crops not being healthy for the soil and pollinators. "The danger that the decline of bees and other pollinators

Do Biotech companies feel they are responsible for the declining bee population? Use of pesticides are very high on GMO crops as well as mono crops not being healthy for the soil and pollinators. "The danger that the decline of bees and other pollinators represents to the world’s food supply was highlighted this week when the European Commission decided to ban a class of pesticides suspected of playing a role in so-called “colony collapse disorder.” http://e360.yale.edu/feature/declining_bee_populations_pose_a_threat_to_global_agriculture/2645/

AExpert Answer

 Thank you for allowing me to clear up some misinformation.

 

While it’s true some commercial beekeepers have experienced problems with overwinter losses in bee colonies, the popular press has greatly exaggerated the situation by suggesting a possible “beepocalypse” or threat of extinction. Believe it or not, statistics kept by government and international bodies show honey bee populations are stable in the U.S. and Europe and dramatically rising worldwide (USDA, government of Canada and FAO).

 

As for the European Commission, it did not ban but did restrict some uses of neonicotinoid insecticides on bee-attractive crops for two years, effective Dec. 1, 2013.

 

Most scientists, including EPA and USDA experts, believe bee health is affected by a variety of stressors. These include pests and diseases; viruses carried by mites and fungus; lack of diverse habitats and poor nutrition; unusual weather conditions, errors in hive management and other beekeeping practices, lack of genetic diversity in bee populations; as well as possible pesticide exposure. Of particular concern is the presence of the Varroa mite, cited in the National Stakeholders Conference on Honey Bee Health report (USDA/EPA, May 2013) as the “single most detrimental pest of honey bees and is closely associated with overwintering colony decline.” 

 

The truth is no one individual factor has been proven to cause bee declines. 

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Hummingbird feeders often contain a sugar solution that is similar to plant nectar. Therefore, bees are attracted to these Hummingbird feeders, because similar to hummingbirds, the sugar/nectar attracts them. There are some hummingbird feeders on the market that are designed to prevent bees, ants, and other insects from getting in.   Bee decline is complex and often misunderstood by the public. Chris Sansone, Global Regulatory Affairs Manager of Insect Resistance Management (... Read More
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Posted on August 15, 2017
GMO crops are not "banned" in any countries around the world in the normal sense of that word. Usually when something is banned for consumption, etc., it is because some problem emerged that needed a response. The history of regulation for biotech crops is quite different in that there were regulatory approval processes developed long before any such crops were commercialized. The goal was to try to anticipate any potential health or environmental issues and to make... Read More
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Posted on February 9, 2017
A species is defined by the ability to reproduce viable offspring, so any two plants within a species generally have the potential to cross pollinate. Like any good successful mating, it requires the union of male and female contributions at the right time, same place. So absolutely, GE crops have the potential to cross with non-GE crops of the same species—if they manage to get it on through time and space.    So the rules that apply to dogs and teenagers also apply to... Read More
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