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Community Manager

Moderator for GMOAnswers.com

Expert Bio

The GMO Answers Community Manager is the website moderator who helps answer your questions by linking to resources on GMO Answers and other online content which addresses GMOs and biotechnology. The Community Manager also ensures the dialogue among the community members remains constructive and respective of all viewpoints. If you have questions about how the community is managed, please visit our house rules, http://gmoanswers.com/house-rules.

Studies, Articles and Answers

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Showing 10 out of 525 results

Question

Q: I have read that researchers have said that the process of creating a GMO is essentially a shotgun approach, rather than the impossible precise insertion that most people believe, and that, in any case, large numbers of toxic proteins are certain to be pr

Answered By Andre Silvanovich - Mar 18, 2014

A: The short answer is: while the initial transformation process can be described as a “shotgun” or random approach, researchers use numerous tools and techniques to eliminate all of the plants where the insertion occurred in an undesirable location or where the insertion could be disrupting or negatively impacting surrounding genes. Then researchers conduct rigorous safety tests on the remaining plants to make sure the insertion did not produce any new proteins—except for the protein that was specifically desired by the insertion. Following is my longer answer, which I broke down to addres [...]

Answered By Community Manager - Feb 18, 2014

A: Thanks for your question! This is a common question about GMOs and has recently been discussed by Denneal Jamison-McClung, associate director of the UC Davis Biotechnology Program. You might find the excerpt below from her response helpful: “Thanks to the genomics revolution and new molecular tools, such as ‘genome editing,’ very specific genetic changes can be easily made to plant genomes, from single nucleotide changes to the insertion or deletion of whole genes (Cressey, 2013; Li, 2013). Genomic changes or “events” moving forward for potential commercialization are well-characterized, [...]

GMO Basics Health & Safety

Question

Q: Why are companies afraid to proudly label their products as produced using GMO technology? Why the subterfuge?

Answered By Community Manager - Jan 06, 2014

A: GMO labeling is a popular topic. You might be interested in reading some expert answers to similar questions posted on the website. Below are several excerpts and links to a few that address your questions. By Andy Hedgecock, Director, Scientific Affairs, DuPont Pioneer (click here to view full response) First, I think it’s important to point out that nearly two decades of science and rigorous global review have demonstrated that biotech crops are safe. Therefore, biotech labeling is a question not of safety, but rather of how food is marketed. At DuPont Pioneer, we develop and mark [...]

GMOs in Groceries Health & Safety Labeling

Question

Q: What makes your industry above the law with the "monsanto's protection act" making you above the law.

Answered By Community Manager - Jul 30, 2013

A: Thanks for your question. Please review the following answer provided by Drew Kershen: What is the Monsanto Protection Act? [...]

Other

Question

Q: How do you ensure that a piece of genetic code produces the desired protein and not a multitude of others. How do you keep junk DNA from becoming active and causing undesired proteins from being produces.

Answered By Community Manager - Jan 30, 2014

A: Great question. Alan McHughen, CE biotechnology specialist and geneticist, provided a related response that might be of interest to you; an excerpt is below: “Genes are composed of long stretches of DNA, which is composed of the chemical building blocks we abbreviate as A, T, C and G (adenine, thymine, cytosine and guanine, respectively).  Just as in the human language English, in which thousands of words are composed of specific sequences of 26 letters, in biology all genes in all species are made of specific sequences of the four DNA bases, A, T, C and G.  The human insulin g [...]

GMO Basics How GMOs Are Made

Question

Q: Why isn't your site answering the important questions? Like "How can you be sure that GMO foods won't affect human health long-term?" There are other important questions (to me as a consumer) that are not being answered on your site. Pleased don't feed me

Answered By Community Manager - Jul 30, 2013

A: The GMO Answers team is collecting questions and working to provide the best possible responses. We are working to vet questions with independent experts when we can, which can take a few days, versus taking an answer “off the shelf.”  See our House Rules on how quickly we hope to answer questions. You can find some specific info on this topic in the Explore the Basics section of this website. [...]

GMO Basics Health & Safety

Question

Q: If GMO has no negative effects, why did my sons asthsma GO AWAY 100% when I switched to all organic? He is too little to 'fake it'. He was on a nebulizer 3x's a day.

Answered By Community Manager - Jul 30, 2013

A: GMO Answers will not comment on a specific individual's health issues. There is no way we could evaluate your son's health history with accuracy or true understanding. GMO Answers addresses inquiries related to biotechnology in agriculture. We invite you post a question that specifically addresses this topic. For more information about how this conversation is moderated, click here. [...]

GMO Basics Health & Safety

Question

Q: What fruits and vegetables have NOT been made into GMO yet?

Answered By Community Manager - Jul 30, 2013

A: Thank you for your question. There are currently eight crops commercially available from GM seeds in the United States: corn (field and sweet), soybeans, cotton, canola, alfalfa, sugar beets, papaya and squash. More information about today’s GM crops and their genetic traits is available in the Explore the Basics section of this website. [...]

GMO Basics How GMOs Are Made

Question

Q: Can you address the link found between genetically modified crops and blood abnormalities including leukemia? I've detailed them here http://www.floatingpath.com/2013/06/24/study-links-genetically-modified-crops-to-leukemia-and-blood-abnormalities/

Answered By Community Manager - Dec 04, 2014

A: Anastasia Bodnar with Biology Fortified, Inc., addressed a study that claims to link GM foods with leukemia in this article. Included in her article is an analysis of the study by Dr. David Tribe, senior lecturer in agriculture and food systems/microbiology and immunology at the University of Melbourne.   Here is an excerpt from the article:   “The Organic Consumers Association (among others) has gleefully announced: New Study Links GMO Food To Leukemia (also saved as a PDF). This article by Sayer Ji was originally published on Green Med Info on 12 [...]

GMO Basics Health & Safety

Question

Q: Were any fees paid to Fortune for their recent publishing of Nina Easton's opinion piece which strongly supported genetically modified foods? Her argument, by the way, is disproven here: http://www.floatingpath.com/2013/06/11/why-nina-easton-is-dead-wrong

Answered By Community Manager - Jul 30, 2013

A: GMO Answers addresses inquiries related to GMOs and agriculture. We do not have any background information on this article and cannot provide an accurate response to your question. We invite you to repost a question that specifically addresses GMOs. For more information about how this conversation is moderated, click here. [...]

Other

Question

Q: Any response on the UCLA study that shows in order to increase wheat crop yields the amount of gluten produced would increase by as much as 4X the normal amount. This empirically suggests a cause and effect relationship between the large increase in glute

Answered By Community Manager - Aug 12, 2013

A: We reached out to Bob Goldberg in the Department of Molecular, Cell and Developmental Biology at UCLA. Included below is his response to this question: “There is no genetically engineered wheat grown anywhere in the world. Wheat was the first crop to be domesticated, ~10,000 years ago, by our ancestors. Gluten is a protein that is naturally found in wheat seeds and is used by the wheat plant when it germinates as a source of carbon and nitrogen for the growing seedling.  Dwarf wheat is not a GMO, as there is no genetically engineered wheat on the market or grown for animal or human [...]

GMO Basics Health & Safety