QWhy is saving seeds, something inherent in nature, illegal? Why are farmers being sued for doing so? Are GMOs designed not to create seeds so farmers have to buy seeds every season? if so, how does that effect bio diversity?

Why is saving seeds, something inherent in nature, illegal? Why are farmers being sued for doing so? Are GMOs designed not to create seeds so farmers have to buy seeds every season? if so, how does that effect bio diversity?

AExpert Answer

In the video below Monsanto Global Preparedness Content Manager, Chelsey Robinson, also addresses this common GMO myth:
 

AExpert Answer

Saving seed in and of itself is not illegal.  However, when farmers choose to purchase GM seed, they sign an agreement stating that they will use the seed solely for the planting of one commercial crop.  Farmers understand this when they make the choice to purchase the seed.  Any farmer who doesn’t want to agree to the required provisions can choose to buy another type of seed as there are many other seed varieties in the marketplace. 

 

Regarding your second question, GM crops produce seeds just like conventional crops. Despite reports to the contrary, none of our companies sell GM seeds that are sterile. We previously answered a similar question about sterile seeds or Terminator seeds here: http://gmoanswers.com/ask/i-keep-reading-about-how-monsantos-seeds-and-other-gm-seeds-become-sterile-and-unusable-farmers.

 

Regarding your question on biodiversity, Martina Newell-McGloughlin addressed a similar question here: http://gmoanswers.com/ask/how-biodiversity-impacted-introduction-gm-crops-are-current-set-crops-being-replace-smaller-less.  

 

If you would like to understand more about the patenting of GM seeds, please see Professor Drew Kershen’s explanation here: http://gmoanswers.com/ask/does-%E2%80%9Cpatent%E2%80%9D-allow-private-company-own-seeds-created-0.

 

If this doesn’t address your exact concerns, please feel free to ask another question.  Thanks.

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Posted on August 4, 2017
GMO Answers is funded by the Council for Biotechnology Information, which is comprised of six different companies: BASF, Bayer, Dow AgroSciences, DuPont Pioneer, Monsanto Company and Syngenta. These companies are committed to the responsible development and application of plant biotechnology. GMO Answers is an initiative committed to responding to your questions about how food is grown, with a goal to make information about GMOs in the food and agriculture easier to access and understand.... Read More

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