QWhat years did GM foods become available to United States consumers, corn, wheat, etc.?

What years did GM foods become available to United States consumers, corn, wheat, etc.?

AExpert Answer

It is important to note that only eight crops are currently available as GM varieties in the United States: alfalfa, canola, cotton, corn, papaya, soybean, some squash and sugar beets. Also, you referenced GM wheat, but there is no GM wheat in production in the United States.  Here is a table outlining what year these crops became available commercially:

 

Squash

Upjohn (now Seminis)

1995

Cotton

Monsanto

1996

Soybean

Monsanto

1995

Corn

Ciba Seeds

1996

Papaya

Cornell University/University of Hawaii

1997

Alfalfa

Monsanto and Forage Genetics

2006

Sugar beets

Monsanto and KWS SAAT AG

2006

Canola

Monsanto

1999

 

This response from Dr. Bob Goldberg, professor in the Department of Molecular, Cell, Developmental Biology at UCLA, discusses the fact that there is no genetically engineered wheat grown anywhere in the world. Additionally, Dr. Brett Carver, Regents Professor and holder of the Wheat Genetics Chair in Agriculture at Oklahoma State University, clarifies the fundamental process by which new wheat varieties are created in this response

 

You might want to check out this table from the U.S. Department of Agriculture, which shows biotechnology petitions for determination of non-regulated status.

 

If you have any additional questions, please ask at http://www.gmoanswers.com/ask.

 

Posted on March 9, 2018
Hello, and thank you for your question! Scientists commonly use genetically engineering (GE) to add and subtract genes from ALL sorts of plants, from common weeds to potatoes from the Andes. Most GE is performed only to learn how plants work. While it’s relatively simple to change a plant’s genetics, it’s difficult and expensive to actually improve a plant’s genetics. Thus, only the most “important” crops are targets for GE. Smaller improvements are... Read More
Answer:
Posted on March 8, 2018
Hello, and thank you for your question! Scientists commonly use genetically engineering (GE) to add and subtract genes from ALL sorts of plants, from common weeds to potatoes from the Andes. Most GE is performed only to learn how plants work. While it’s relatively simple to change a plant’s genetics, it’s difficult and expensive to actually improve a plant’s genetics. Thus, only the most “important” crops are targets for GE. Smaller improvements are... Read More
Posted on March 9, 2018
Anyone who has traveled through the Southeast and seen kudzu vines along the highway knows that plants can evolve into a negative outcome. There is a similar concern that a GMO can produce negative outcomes in the environment.  Therefore, prior to approving their commercial planting, GMOs must be tested in contained field trials to ensure that they do not behave in ways that could cause problems. To prevent negative outcomes, GMOs must not have the ability to cross with wild... Read More