QAny response on the UCLA study that shows in order to increase wheat crop yields the amount of gluten produced would increase by as much as 4X the normal amount. This empirically suggests a cause and effect relationship between the large increase in glute

Any response on the UCLA study that shows in order to increase wheat crop yields the amount of gluten produced would increase by as much as 4X the normal amount. This empirically suggests a cause and effect relationship between the large increase in gluten intolerance the country has seen and the use of GMO wheat crops, wouldn't you agree?

AExpert Answer

We reached out to Bob Goldberg in the Department of Molecular, Cell and Developmental Biology at UCLA. Included below is his response to this question:

 

“There is no genetically engineered wheat grown anywhere in the world. Wheat was the first crop to be domesticated, ~10,000 years ago, by our ancestors. Gluten is a protein that is naturally found in wheat seeds and is used by the wheat plant when it germinates as a source of carbon and nitrogen for the growing seedling.  Dwarf wheat is not a GMO, as there is no genetically engineered wheat on the market or grown for animal or human consumption. It is true that some people are gluten intolerant―having an allergy to the gluten storage protein―similar to a peanut allergy, which is also due to a seed storage protein different from gluten. However, gluten intolerance has been known for a long time and is due to a natural protein, not a genetically engineered one. And there is little scientific evidence that the presence of gluten in wheat has caused an increase in obesity, because humans have been eating wheat seed byproducts (e.g., bread) for thousands of years. The increase in obesity can be attributed to many complex factors―one of which is an increase in calorie consumption regardless of source.”

Posted on November 17, 2017
When people refer to Genetically Modified Organisms (GMOs), they are referring to precision plant breeding using genetic engineering. It allows plant breeders to take a desirable trait (like resistance to drought, insects, weeds, and disease) from one plant or organism and transfer it to the plant they want to improve, as well as make a change to an existing trait in a plant they are developing. You may have also heard of agricultural biotechnology or biotech seeds.... Read More
Answer:
Posted on October 26, 2017
An "LMO" (Living Modified Organism) is basically a GMO that is alive and capable of passing on its genes to a subsequent generation. In most situations, the terms LMO and GMO are essentially synonymous, but neither term is really used by most biotechnologists! More on that below.    The term LMO was used in the Cartegena Protocol (basically a big document that came out of an international convention several years ago, more detailed info here.)   The reason we as... Read More
Answer:
Posted on October 6, 2017
Biotechnology as a discipline focuses on understanding molecular biology and has applications in medicine/health, environmental science, industrial products and agriculture. Biotechnology is widely used in all these sectors. I will focus my answer on agricultural biotechnology.   In many countries (e.g., Brazil, Canada, India, and the United States) a significant amount of agricultural research, especially basic research in molecular biology, is conducted by governmental agricultural... Read More