QWhy is it killing bees?

Why is it killing bees?

AExpert Answer

The scientific community recognizes that bee health is a very complex issue. In fact, a report from the proceedings of the U.S. National Academy of Sciences indicated that bees may be dying not from a single toxin or disease, but rather from a variety of factors that include introduced pests and parasites, microbial diseases, inadequate diet and loss of genetic diversity. In its assessment of neonicotinoid insecticides, the Environmental Protection Agency stated that it “is not aware of any data indicating that honey bee declines or the incidence of CCD [colony collapse disorder] in the U.S. is correlated with the use of pesticides in general or with the use of neonicotinoids in particular.”  Modern seed treatments reduce the amount of insecticides in the environment and target pesticides only at the insects that are actually feeding on food crops, thus protecting other, often beneficial insects, including bees. Moreover, even though seed treatments make neonicotinoids part of the plant, the amount reaching bees in pollen grains is extremely tiny and not thought to be a factor in CCD or bee mortality.

Posted on July 28, 2017
Hummingbird feeders often contain a sugar solution that is similar to plant nectar. Therefore, bees are attracted to these Hummingbird feeders, because similar to hummingbirds, the sugar/nectar attracts them. There are some hummingbird feeders on the market that are designed to prevent bees, ants, and other insects from getting in.   Bee decline is complex and often misunderstood by the public. Chris Sansone, Global Regulatory Affairs Manager of Insect Resistance Management (... Read More
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Posted on August 15, 2017
GMO crops are not "banned" in any countries around the world in the normal sense of that word. Usually when something is banned for consumption, etc., it is because some problem emerged that needed a response. The history of regulation for biotech crops is quite different in that there were regulatory approval processes developed long before any such crops were commercialized. The goal was to try to anticipate any potential health or environmental issues and to make... Read More
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Posted on February 9, 2017
A species is defined by the ability to reproduce viable offspring, so any two plants within a species generally have the potential to cross pollinate. Like any good successful mating, it requires the union of male and female contributions at the right time, same place. So absolutely, GE crops have the potential to cross with non-GE crops of the same species—if they manage to get it on through time and space.    So the rules that apply to dogs and teenagers also apply to... Read More
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