QWhy did your industry fight so hard to water down the recent GMO labeling law passed in Connecticut? Also, why did your industry spend over $50 million in 2012 to defeat similar labeling laws in California?http://www.floatingpath.com/2013/06/06/gmo-labeli

Why did your industry fight so hard to water down the recent GMO labeling law passed in Connecticut? Also, why did your industry spend over $50 million in 2012 to defeat similar labeling laws in California? http://www.floatingpath.com/2013/06/06/gmo-labeling-law-passed-in-connecticut-is-first-of-its-kind/

AExpert Answer

The industry is spending money to defeat legislation that is largely drafted out of misunderstanding and fear. Those pressing for this legislation in many cases are ultimately looking to ban a technology that we absolutely need to continue to feed our growing population at affordable prices using less inputs and less land. I’ve recently posted an article that addresses Prop 37,  "Standing Up to the True Mission of the 'Just Label It' Crowd," on the  Truth About Trade & Technology blog.  A previous response on GMO Answers, available here, addresses the Connecticut labeling issue.

The response, included below, addresses issues raised in your question. If you have additional questions after reading this response, please ask.

Anti-biotech activists are like zombies in a horror movie: No matter how many times you defeat them, they keep snapping back to life, determined to wreak brand-new havoc.

"So, a month after suffering a bad loss in California on Election Day, they’re shifting their misconceived movement to Connecticut, Oregon, Vermont and elsewhere. The next engagement is already well underway in the state of Washington, where the frightening extremism of what they really hope to achieve is also on full display.

 

"Their outrageous goal is nothing less than a complete ban of crops enhanced by biotechnology—and they must be stopped.

"The opponents of biotechnology try to present a reasonable face to the public, but their real agenda is radical—and it’s already on full view in the state of Washington.

"On Election Day, as Californians were casting their ballots against Prop 37, voters in Washington’s San Juan County considered an even more dangerous measure: a total ban on the growing of GM crops.

"San Juan County, home to fewer than 16,000 people, is tiny compared to California and its population of almost 37 million. So its drastic initiative didn’t generate much attention during the campaign season—and neither did the result, in which 61 percent of the county’s voters decided to outlaw the kinds of plants that farmers in much of the rest of the country take for granted.

"This is the true mission of the anti-biotech movement: the utter elimination of genetically modified crops from the United States.

"If the 'Just Label It' crowd wanted to stop at labeling, its leaders would have condemned the vote in San Juan County. But they did no such thing. For people who love to spew out press releases and shout on blogs, their silence was curious—and also revealing.

"The rest of us must speak out against both the effort to push new food-label laws and the even more harmful agenda that lies behind it. We know the truth about modern food and agriculture, and it’s our job once again to make sure voters hear about it as well."

Posted on August 15, 2017
No! However, poor nutrition coupled with highly processed foods and a lack of education regarding healthy eating is bad for our kids. As a mother and farmer, I believe the best way to keep my family safe and healthy is to make sure they eat a balanced diet and make good food choices daily. Fresh, healthy ingredients and minimally processed foods that are low in sugar, salt, calories and cholesterol provide kids with the best opportunity for a healthy diet. Agricultural biotechnology... Read More
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Posted on February 9, 2017
A species is defined by the ability to reproduce viable offspring, so any two plants within a species generally have the potential to cross pollinate. Like any good successful mating, it requires the union of male and female contributions at the right time, same place. So absolutely, GE crops have the potential to cross with non-GE crops of the same species—if they manage to get it on through time and space.    So the rules that apply to dogs and teenagers also apply to... Read More
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Posted on March 2, 2017
Here is a set of slides prepared by the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) that discusses the sketch approval process. As the slides indicate, there are four categories of labels that require prior sketch approval: temporary labels, religious exemption, exports with labeling deviations, and special statements and claims. In the situation raised by your question, it is the last category (special statements and claims) that would... Read More
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