QWhy did your industry fight so hard to water down the recent GMO labeling law passed in Connecticut? Also, why did your industry spend over $50 million in 2012 to defeat similar labeling laws in California?http://www.floatingpath.com/2013/06/06/gmo-labeli

Why did your industry fight so hard to water down the recent GMO labeling law passed in Connecticut? Also, why did your industry spend over $50 million in 2012 to defeat similar labeling laws in California? http://www.floatingpath.com/2013/06/06/gmo-labeling-law-passed-in-connecticut-is-first-of-its-kind/

AExpert Answer

The industry is spending money to defeat legislation that is largely drafted out of misunderstanding and fear. Those pressing for this legislation in many cases are ultimately looking to ban a technology that we absolutely need to continue to feed our growing population at affordable prices using less inputs and less land. I’ve recently posted an article that addresses Prop 37,  "Standing Up to the True Mission of the 'Just Label It' Crowd," on the  Truth About Trade & Technology blog.  A previous response on GMO Answers, available here, addresses the Connecticut labeling issue.

The response, included below, addresses issues raised in your question. If you have additional questions after reading this response, please ask.

Anti-biotech activists are like zombies in a horror movie: No matter how many times you defeat them, they keep snapping back to life, determined to wreak brand-new havoc.

"So, a month after suffering a bad loss in California on Election Day, they’re shifting their misconceived movement to Connecticut, Oregon, Vermont and elsewhere. The next engagement is already well underway in the state of Washington, where the frightening extremism of what they really hope to achieve is also on full display.

 

"Their outrageous goal is nothing less than a complete ban of crops enhanced by biotechnology—and they must be stopped.

"The opponents of biotechnology try to present a reasonable face to the public, but their real agenda is radical—and it’s already on full view in the state of Washington.

"On Election Day, as Californians were casting their ballots against Prop 37, voters in Washington’s San Juan County considered an even more dangerous measure: a total ban on the growing of GM crops.

"San Juan County, home to fewer than 16,000 people, is tiny compared to California and its population of almost 37 million. So its drastic initiative didn’t generate much attention during the campaign season—and neither did the result, in which 61 percent of the county’s voters decided to outlaw the kinds of plants that farmers in much of the rest of the country take for granted.

"This is the true mission of the anti-biotech movement: the utter elimination of genetically modified crops from the United States.

"If the 'Just Label It' crowd wanted to stop at labeling, its leaders would have condemned the vote in San Juan County. But they did no such thing. For people who love to spew out press releases and shout on blogs, their silence was curious—and also revealing.

"The rest of us must speak out against both the effort to push new food-label laws and the even more harmful agenda that lies behind it. We know the truth about modern food and agriculture, and it’s our job once again to make sure voters hear about it as well."

Posted on March 9, 2018
Sun Pacific oranges are not a GM food, in fact all oranges are not a GM crop. Nearly all foods today have been genetically modified or altered in some way over thousands of years through selective breeding. But there are only 10 commercially available GM crops in the U.S: soybeans, corn (field and sweet), canola, cotton, alfalfa, sugar beets, summer squash, papaya, potatoes and apples. Below is a table outlining what year the 10 crops became commercially available:  ... Read More
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Posted on March 8, 2018
That’s a great question because so many people ‘expect’ there to be a difference and taste is purely a subjective assessment. So the answer is – it depends. Examples when the “look” would be different: Golden Rice: his rice has been engineered to be higher in Beta-carotene, using a gene from maize/corn, to help reduce the incidence of Vitamin A deficiency in developing countries whose Vitamin A content in the diet is so low, that results in blindness,... Read More
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Posted on February 28, 2018
On average, GMOs take 13 years and $130 million of research and development before coming to market. We’ve created the below infographic that outlines this process in more detail: The following infographic includes excerpts from more than 600+ safety assessment studies which assess the health and safety of GMOs. You can also read more about the regulatory review and approval process in Wendelyn Jones, Global Regulatory Affairs, DowDuPont Crop Protection’s response to a... Read More
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