QWhat cooking oils are NonGMO?

What cooking oils are NonGMO?

AExpert Answer

The most widely used cooking oils for home use are soybean, canola, corn, sunflower, olive, and peanut. Other specialty oils are sold but aren’t widely used (e.g. grapeseed oil). Of the major cooking oils, olive, sunflower, and peanut oil come from crops where no GMO technology is used. In addition, any organic versions of soy or canola oil would not make use of any GM technology. However, through processing, one cannot tell the difference between GM and non-GM soy and canola cooking oils. They are chemically the same.

Posted on June 19, 2017
Yes, the EU is one of the geographies where GM-derived food and animal feed must be labeled according to conditions outlined by the European Commission on this webpage. GM labels are very common on sacks of animal feed. Depending on the type of animal, GM labeled feed is often the standard – except of course when it comes to GM free or organic supply chains. Read More
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Posted on April 12, 2017
There are no GM tomatoes on the market but there is quite a bit of misinformation about GM crops on the Internet – for example “spooky” Fish DNA in tomatoes - that is designed to mislead and scare consumers.                                             ... Read More
Posted on March 2, 2017
The term “GMO” typically refers to crops or animals that, through genetic engineering, have had a gene (or a few genes) from a different species inserted into their genome. So yes, by design, to improve a crop or animal with genetic engineering, the genome of the new, GE variety has been changed by the addition of new genes(s).     Your question also asks about whether inserting the new gene(s) will “…activate genes…” Some traits in... Read More