QIf GMO is so safe then why are Monsanto campuses 100% non-GMO and Organic. In other words why don't your own scientist eat your frankin-food. Seems to me pretty telling that if the guys that make this crud won't eat it then the general public probably s

If GMO is so safe then why are Monsanto campuses 100% non-GMO and Organic. In other words why don't your own scientist eat your frankin-food. Seems to me pretty telling that if the guys that make this crud won't eat it then the general public probably shouldn't. Then there's the little problem of almost EVERY other nation on the planet has banned GMO. So why are you guys trying to push this crud on the American people?

AExpert Answer

Your question seems to be an extension of an urban myth that started back in 1999.  Our cafeterias serve all types of food―including foods with ingredients from GM crops―every day. None of it is singled out as conventional or organic. It’s just food served in our cafeterias, the same food that everyone else eats.

 

I also want to make it clear that not only do our cafeterias serve foods made with GM ingredients, but they actually go out of their way on occasion to specifically source our genetically modified products. In fact, in August, we had a sweet-corn celebration that included serving our biotech/GM sweet corn in the cafeteria for a week and inviting a local farmer who grows that sweet corn on campus for a 1-day farmers' market. Our St. Louis-based employees were so excited to buy our biotech/GMO sweet corn that there were long lines and the farmer sold out of all of the corn that he brought.

 

We posted photos and a video from the event on our blog.  You can read and view more here.

 

Regarding your question about bans, I am going to refer you to a very in-depth response to a similar question on GMO Answers: If GMOs are so great, why does Monsanto serve organic produce in it's cafeteria? 

Posted on August 15, 2017
  On average, the recent research that has been conducted on GMOs, on a per product basis is calculated to be an average of $130 Million (and 13 years). This is a per product average, so each product that reaches commercialization in a given year would also cost something similar to this value.   Please see below for additional helpful resources: The Cost and time involved in the discovery, development and authorization of a new plant biotechnology derived trait by Phillips... Read More
Posted on February 9, 2017
A species is defined by the ability to reproduce viable offspring, so any two plants within a species generally have the potential to cross pollinate. Like any good successful mating, it requires the union of male and female contributions at the right time, same place. So absolutely, GE crops have the potential to cross with non-GE crops of the same species—if they manage to get it on through time and space.    So the rules that apply to dogs and teenagers also apply to... Read More
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Posted on August 4, 2017
GMO Answers is funded by the Council for Biotechnology Information, which is comprised of six different companies: BASF, Bayer, Dow AgroSciences, DuPont Pioneer, Monsanto Company and Syngenta. These companies are committed to the responsible development and application of plant biotechnology. GMO Answers is an initiative committed to responding to your questions about how food is grown, with a goal to make information about GMOs in the food and agriculture easier to access and understand.... Read More