QGeneral Mills said they will now have some Cheerios without GMOs. The company said there is no concern about safety with GMOs and the media reports I read say that oats are not genetically modified anyway. So why is General Mills doing this?

General Mills said they will now have some Cheerios without GMOs. The company said there is no concern about safety with GMOs and the media reports I read say that oats are not genetically modified anyway. So why is General Mills doing this?

AExpert Answer

Several experts responded to the announcement from General Mills that Cheerios will no longer include GM ingredients.

 

You might be interested in an excerpt from a response from Cathleen Enright, executive director for the Council for Biotechnology Information:

 

We believe food companies have the right to select the ingredients that are best for their markets, just as farmers have the right to choose the seeds that are right for their businesses. We appreciated General Mills’ transparency in this regard. General Mills did a good job explaining the change and reinforcing the safety of GMOs. (General Mills’ statements are available online: http://blog.generalmills.com/2014/01/the-one-and-only-cheerios and http://cheerios.com/en/Articles/cheerios-and-gmos.) General Mills’ position on GMOs has not changed. (General Mills’ position on GMOs is available online: 
http://www.generalmills.com/Home/ChannelG/on_biotechnology.aspx.) This was a marketing decision…”

 

You can read the full response and additional responses from other experts here: http://gmoanswers.com/experts-respond-general-mills-cheerios-announcement.

 

If you have additional questions, please ask at http://www.gmoanswers.com/ask.

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