QCan you address the link found between genetically modified crops and blood abnormalities including leukemia? I've detailed them here http://www.floatingpath.com/2013/06/24/study-links-genetically-modified-crops-to-leukemia-and-blood-abnormalities/

Can you address the link found between genetically modified crops and blood abnormalities including leukemia? I've detailed them here http://www.floatingpath.com/2013/06/24/study-links-genetically-modified-crops-to-leukemia-and-blood-abnormalities/

AExpert Answer

Anastasia Bodnar with Biology Fortified, Inc., addressed a study that claims to link GM foods with leukemia in this article. Included in her article is an analysis of the study by Dr. David Tribe, senior lecturer in agriculture and food systems/microbiology and immunology at the University of Melbourne.

 

Here is an excerpt from the article:

 

“The Organic Consumers Association (among others) has gleefully announced: New Study Links GMO Food To Leukemia (also saved as a PDF). This article by Sayer Ji was originally published on Green Med Info on 12 May 2013. The paper is Hematotoxicity of Bacillus thuringiensis as Spore-crystal Strains Cry1Aa, Cry1Ab, Cry1Ac or Cry2Aa in Swiss Albino Mice by Mezzomo et al, published first in November 2012 then again in March 2013 (more on that later).

 

“The article states: “Bt toxins are capable of targeting mammalian cells, particularly the erythroid (red blood cell) lineage, resulting in red blood cell changes indicative of significant damage, such as anemia. In addition, the study found that Bt toxins suppressed bone marrow proliferation creating abnormal lymphocyte patterns consistent with some types of leukemia.”

 

“Except, the article doesn’t actually say that at all. I have a few quick observations, then a rebuttal provided by our own Dr. David Tribe, and I wrap up this latest edition of whack-a-mole with a revelation. There’s a lot more to say about this paper, and hopefully we will learn more as time goes by, but this post is just a fast attempt to help people know that this is not a good paper to be pointing at.”

 

If you have any additional questions, please ask.

Posted on January 31, 2018
Thank you for your question. There are various aspects of your question. I assume your question refers to the use of Agrobacterium rhizogenes by scientists to intentionally transfer genes from the bacterium to plants. Infection and DNA transfer from this bacterium occurs in nature all the time to cause disease. Such transformed plants are not classified as GMOs since transfer occurred naturally. If this is done by scientists then it would be classified as a GMO. Rules and... Read More
Answer:
Posted on March 1, 2018
I’m a Monsanto scientist who has more than 20 years of experience with genetic modification of plants. I will try to answer your question, even though I don’t ever do experiments on animals, certainly not on humans, of course! Can humans be genetically modified…but a much bigger question is should humans be genetically modified? There are two ways to think about genetic modification of humans (or any animal). One way is modification of somatic cells, and the other is the... Read More
Answer:
Posted on May 10, 2017
The simple answer is that 20+ years of composition assessments of GMO crops have demonstrated that crop composition is not appreciably affected by the GM process (1). In addition, data collected through that time have indicated that general factors such as the growth environment can contribute to notable variation in component levels (2). Plant agglutinins (or lectins) and amylase inhibitors are examples of anti-nutritional compounds that may be present in crops. The relevance of such a... Read More