QAre there any long term (30+ years) studies done on the full spectrum ecological impact of transgenic GMO organisms?If there are no long term, full spectrum studies done, then why is GMO considered "safe" and approved for public use? The studies should al

Are there any long term (30+ years) studies done on the full spectrum ecological impact of transgenic GMO organisms? If there are no long term, full spectrum studies done, then why is GMO considered "safe" and approved for public use? The studies should also include the uses and effects of pesticides/herbicides used in conjunction with the transgenic GMO products, and the full spectrum ecological effects (long term) for every organism affected by transgenic GMO and the chemicals being sprayed in a monoculture environment for 30+ years. If a study like this does not exist, please let me know. Then let me know why "science" thinks it is safe and how science can predict the future. Remember DDT? How about Thalidomide?

Thank you for your question. One of our experts will get back to you soon.

Posted on May 6, 2017
A gene with a desirable trait can be moved from one organism to another organism as a means to change it. The traditional way is through selective breeding, which is slow, time consuming, inefficient, and transfers more than one gene, so other unexpected and unwanted traits can cause problems. But genes also can be moved in a laboratory, resulting in what has been called a genetically modified (“transgenic”) organism (GMO). GM technology moves only one gene, eliminating other,... Read More
Answer:
Posted on May 6, 2017
A gene with a desirable trait can be moved from one organism to another organism as a means to change it. The traditional way is through selective breeding, which is slow, time consuming, inefficient, and transfers more than one gene, so other unexpected and unwanted traits can cause problems. But genes also can be moved in a laboratory, resulting in what has been called a genetically modified (“transgenic”) organism (GMO). GM technology moves only one gene, eliminating other,... Read More
Answer:
Posted on February 9, 2017
A species is defined by the ability to reproduce viable offspring, so any two plants within a species generally have the potential to cross pollinate. Like any good successful mating, it requires the union of male and female contributions at the right time, same place. So absolutely, GE crops have the potential to cross with non-GE crops of the same species—if they manage to get it on through time and space.    So the rules that apply to dogs and teenagers also apply to... Read More
Answer: