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The fact that glyphosate kills wheat pretty much precludes it from being in the grain produced by wheat. Only situation I can think of glyphosate application in wheat is harvest aid application. I suppose there could be some residual from a crop harvest aid treatment to kill weeds, but that likely would not be taken up by the grain, but might be present as trace amounts if it can be tested for glyphosate residue. To know if the wheat grains are free from glyphosate traces in case...

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Technically, you can mix traits among species, which is how transgenic work is done. The first transgenic mouse was introduced with the human growth hormone gene, and by overexpressing the growth hormone, the mouse grew bigger, but not the same as human size. This is more like the function of the gene. Whether it can mix the physical features between species will be different, but something like a chimera study that mixes animals of two strains might carry physical features of both. However,...

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Technically, you can mix traits among species, which is how transgenic work is done. The first transgenic mouse was introduced with the human growth hormone gene, and by overexpressing the growth hormone, the mouse grew bigger, but not the same as human size. This is more like the function of the gene. Whether it can mix the physical features between species will be different, but something like a chimera study that mixes animals of two strains might carry physical features of both. However,...

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The term “GMO” typically refers to crops or animals that, through genetic engineering, have had a gene (or a few genes) from a different species inserted into their genome. This is by design to improve a crop or animal with genetic engineering. In fact, me and my colleagues recently published a paper on this very topic that addresses this very topic and gives more details on the plant selection practices used for GE crops. ...

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Nearly all foods today have been genetically modified or altered in some way over thousands of years through selective breeding. However, there are only 10 commercially available GMO crops in the U.S: soybeans, corn (field and sweet), canola, cotton, alfalfa, sugar beets, summer squash, papaya, potatoes and apples. ...

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There are currently no breeding techniques used to create genetic variations of hair textures. If a person wishes to change their hair texture in any way, they are currently limited to the available hair care products sold for those purposes. ...

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One of the great things about farming is our ability to grow many different crops, while at the same time having the choices to raise them in different fashions, with or without biotech in the crops, especially in crops like corn. This can also be challenging as we have to work with our neighbors to make sure what we are growing doesn't cause a negative effect on what they are growing. This can happen in many different instances.  ...

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When people refer to Genetically Modified Organisms (GMOs), they are referring to precision plant breeding using genetic engineering. It allows plant breeders to take a desirable trait (like resistance to drought, insects, weeds, and disease) from one plant or organism and transfer it to the plant they want to improve, as well as make a change to an existing trait in a plant they are developing. You may have also heard of agricultural biotechnology or biotech seeds....

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A similar question has been answered here  If you have any additional questions, please ask!

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GMOs can affect the environment in many ways, and this response discusses the many ways in which GMOs can benefit the environment and the impact GM crops have on the environment. The data in this response from Brookes and Barfoot is from 2013, updated information can be found in their most recent report here. ...

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