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Thanks for the question. I believe you are asking about how corn hybrids are produced. For starters, corn plants have both female (silks and cobs) and male parts (tassels). This means that in a field of corn, any plant can fertilize any other plant (hybrid), including itself (inbred).   ...

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There are many ingredients in livestock feeds. The most common ingredients that might be genetically modified (GM) crops are corn, soybeans, and alfalfa hay. The safety of these feeds being fed to livestock has been evaluated in hundreds of studies with no adverse effects on animal health. The percentage of actual genetically modified DNA ingested by the animal is extremely small, much less than 1 percent of their total intake. We can say, unequivocally, that GMOs present no potential for...

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Hello, and thank you for your question! ...

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Farmers have a choice to which seed they purchase, sell, plant and grow - whether biotech, conventional or organic. Although, with the 10 crops available in the U.S., only a few varieties of sweet corn, squash, potato and apples have genetically engineered options. ...

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In the United States, livestock have been consuming feed made from genetically modified crops for almost twenty years. More than two-thirds of GM corn and half of GM soybeans are used for livestock feed. In that time, GMOs have never been detected in the milk, meat or eggs derived from animals fed genetically modified feed. Meaning livestock process GMO feed in the same way as any other feed.  ...

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No, in fact, as explained in this response, “the overwhelming consensus of scientific experts and major scientific authorities around the world, including the World Health Organization, United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization and the American Medical Association have ruled that GMOs are safe.” ...

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That’s actually a pretty difficult question to really pin down. As you say, this was asked in 2015, but we set out to find out if that number had changed at all.  ...

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One of the great things about farming is our ability to grow many different crops, while at the same time having the choices to raise them in different fashions, with or without biotech in the crops, especially in crops like corn. This can also be challenging as we have to work with our neighbors to make sure what we are growing doesn't cause a negative effect on what they are growing. This can happen in many different instances.  ...

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A species is defined by the ability to reproduce viable offspring, so any two plants within a species generally have the potential to cross pollinate. Like any good successful mating, it requires the union of male and female contributions at the right time, same place. So absolutely, GE crops have the potential to cross with non-GE crops of the same species—if they manage to get it on through time and space.  ...

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