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First, the question is wrongly framed; it’s not true that there’s less “usage” of GMOs in developing countries. In a 2016 report, the International Service for the Acquisition of Agri-biotech Applications (ISAAA) reported that “of the top five countries growing 91 percent of biotech crops, three are developing countries (Brazil, Argentina, and India).” The other two were the U.S. and Canada. Although the U.S. led biotech crop planting in 2016...

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Thank you for your question. This question has been previously been answered in this response. A snippet of is included below: ...

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GMOs will not “save the world,” however they are an important tool in the toolbox for food security and agriculture. ...

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Thank you for your question. We have answered similar questions about the effects GMOs have on the environment below: How are GMOs currently affecting the environment, and are the effects expected to change in the future? Are there any environmental risks associated with GMOs? Do GMOs help or harm the environment? We hope this answers your question, if you have any additional questions, please ask!  

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The principle reason that GM products such as Arctic apples are not available in Germany or any other country of the European Union is due to the GMO labelling legislation in place there. Presently, any food product that contains GM ingredients of greater than 0.9 percent has to be labelled as being a GM food product. The environmental non-governmental organizations have led extensive public relation campaigns to convince European consumers that GM labels are to be viewed as a warning, or...

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This question has previously been answered by a [no-lexicon]variety[/no-lexicon] experts. ...

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GMO crops are not "banned" in any countries around the world in the normal sense of that word. Usually when something is banned for consumption, etc., it is because some problem emerged that needed a response. The history of regulation for biotech crops is quite different in that there were regulatory approval processes developed long before any such crops were commercialized. The goal was to try to anticipate any potential health or environmental issues and to make...

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Here is a set of slides prepared by the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) that discusses the sketch approval process. As the slides indicate, there are four categories of labels that require prior sketch approval: temporary labels, religious exemption, exports with labeling deviations, and special statements and claims. In the situation raised by your question, it is the last category (special statements and claims) that would...

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To feed the world, we need to reduce food waste, while increasing the yield of food in a sustainable way on land already dedicated to agriculture—and GMOs can help! Genetically modified (GM) foods provide a nutritional and safe alternate to conventionally produced foods. However, the GM food (or GMO) may have an undesired characteristic removed from it (example: for longer shelf life, such as Artic Apples, which do no brown after slicing) OR a characteristic can be introduced to aid in...

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Thank you for your question. Our expert, Joe Guenthner, Professor Emeritus of Agricultural Economics at the University of Idaho has answered a similar question discussing the sweet potatoes in Sweden and Spain. Read the full response here. To better understand why GMOs were initially created in agriculture and the evolution of crop modification we encourage you to read more here. If you have any additional questions, please ask!

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