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We have answered similar questions about GMOs being “good” or “bad.” ...

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The simple answer is that 20+ years of composition assessments of GMO crops have demonstrated that crop composition is not appreciably affected by the GM process (1). In addition, data collected through that time have indicated that general factors such as the growth environment can contribute to notable variation in component levels (2). ...

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We invite you to check out this video that explains the story of the Hawaiian Rainbow Papaya. This video thoroughly explains how the traits from specific donor organisms were implanted into the Rainbow Papaya’s DNA to make it PRSV resistant with particular techniques.

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Keith Reding, Biotech Regulatory Policy Lead at Monsanto, explains how Roundup Ready was developed in a similar question that was asked. ...

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Interesting question - that's a good example of how the term "GMO" (genetically modified organism) is too vague to be really useful. In a sense, yes, your genes are modified compared to both of your parents. And you're definitely not genetically identical to your parents (unless you're a yeast, or a starfish, or a willow tree, or some other organism that can reproduce asexually).   ...

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Hello, and thank you for your question! ...

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Anyone who has traveled through the Southeast and seen kudzu vines along the highway knows that plants can evolve into a negative outcome. There is a similar concern that a GMO can produce negative outcomes in the environment.  ...

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GMOs are made to achieve a desired trait, such as resistance to an insect or improvement to the ripening process, in order to better meet a customer’s needs. ...

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Hello, and thanks for your question. Scientists add (and sometimes subtract) DNA from plants all the time, but mostly this is done to learn how plants work. There are relatively few examples of DNA being added to improve crops, but the exceptions are notable as they've had a big impact on agriculture. ...

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