Information and Resources - answers

Don't see the information you're looking for? Submit a question
Posted on

When glyphosate is applied to plants (e.g., crops or weeds) a certain percentage is absorbed and transported throughout the plant. The amount absorbed is variable depending on the application rate and the type of plant. Very little of the absorbed glyphosate is degraded by the plant and cannot be removed. Its persistence in plants is also variable. Federal regulatory agencies have established allowable limits for glyphosate residues in many different crops to protect human and animal health....

Read More
Posted on

Believe it or not, I jump at opportunities to talk about aquatic life, so thank you for your interest. I developed a passion for aquatic animals early on and remain grateful that I have managed to explore my passions in ecotoxicology for over 25 years! ...

Read More
Posted on

Believe it or not, I jump at opportunities to talk about aquatic life, so thank you for your interest. I developed a passion for aquatic animals early on and remain grateful that I have managed to explore my passions in ecotoxicology for over 25 years! ...

Read More
Posted on

Believe it or not, I jump at opportunities to talk about aquatic life, so thank you for your interest. I developed a passion for aquatic animals early on and remain grateful that I have managed to explore my passions in ecotoxicology for over 25 years! ...

Read More
Posted on

While biodiversity is an important issue, the relationship to agriculture and to agricultural crop protection chemicals is a bit complex.  First of all, since its beginnings 10,000 or more years ago, farming has been quite intentionally an effort to make one plant species dominant in any given tended area or field.  From the plant biodiversity side, the struggle has always been with other plant species that are particularly “weedy” which means they are well adapted to...

Read More
Posted on

In order to answer this question, it is important to first be clear about what a GMO/GMO farm is and secondly to discuss the complex issues relating to herbicide and pesticide use. ...

Read More
Posted on

To expand on the answer to your question, glyphosate is used in the production of wheat in the U.S., however, its use is limited. In the majority of U.S. wheat fields, it isn’t used at all. In fact, for 2016, it was applied to only 33 percent of wheat acres in the U.S., according to an independent consumer research firm, GfK. Of this 33 percent, nearly all of the acres have glyphosate applied when a harvestable wheat crop is not present, either in fallow or no-till cropping systems...

Read More
Posted on

The fact that glyphosate kills wheat pretty much precludes it from being in the grain produced by wheat. Only situation I can think of glyphosate application in wheat is harvest aid application. I suppose there could be some residual from a crop harvest aid treatment to kill weeds, but that likely would not be taken up by the grain, but might be present as trace amounts if it can be tested for glyphosate residue. To know if the wheat grains are free from glyphosate traces in case...

Read More
Posted on

In all cases, users of a pesticide should refer to the affixed product label prior to use. This label should contain advice about planting restrictions. If this label isn’t available or questions remain, the user should contact the manufacturer of the product to obtain information about the proper application, restrictions and safety of the specific product prior to its use.

Read More
Posted on

There are currently only nine GMO crops that are commercially available. The badia chia seed is not a GM crop. ...

Read More