QTo your opinion, how is the continuing GMO-experimentings in wineproducing grapevines, (to create a possible 'beter' havest...) defendable in despite of the fact over 400.000 hactares of grapevines in Europe have to be destroyed by European government law

To your opinion, how is the continuing GMO-experimentings in wineproducing grapevines, (to create a possible 'beter' havest...) defendable in despite of the fact over 400.000 hactares of grapevines in Europe have to be destroyed by European government law, making -already- many, many Europeans lose their way of living ? Thank you for answering. Andre.

AExpert Answer

The wine industry in the Europe has issues of over-production and challenges from competition in export markets.  Certain "reforms" of the industry are being orchestrated by the EU in an attempt to address this situation (http://ec.europa.eu/agriculture/capreform/wine/potential/index_en.htm). I can't really comment on the wisdom or fairness of that process, but anything that negatively impacts a grower is of concern to me.  There are some ideas for transgenic traits which could help to make EU wine grape production more competitive vs. other production regions around the world.   European grape growing conditions tend to be much wetter than those in California, Chile, Argentina, Australia or South Africa. Because of that, more fungicide applications are necessary to protect the crop. There could be significant cost-savings if, for instance, genes for resistance to a disease like Downey Mildew could be moved from North American grape species to Vitis vinifera. Moving those traits through conventional breeding would compromise wine quality, while a genetic engineering approach could preserve the quality traits while altering the level of disease resistance.  That said, it is extremely unlikely that genetically modified grapes would be accepted in Europe as evidenced by the extreme reaction to even a small, government-run experiment with a modified rootstock in Colmar, France in 2010 (http://www.digitaljournal.com/article/296083). Whether the EU should continue research in this area is more of a political than a scientific question, and I can only address the latter (http://www.biofortified.org/2013/10/gmo-wine-grapes/).

Posted on September 5, 2017
While there might be some institutions with the capability to make these transgenic watermelon and coconut plants for you, that does not mean that you would be able to actually plant them out. First, the institution would need to have a Biological Use Authorization to work with recombinant DNA to make the vectors to transfer the genes. Then they would need to be able to do the tissue culture required to transfer the genes and regenerate whole plants again, which can sometimes be difficult.... Read More
Posted on June 28, 2017
The short answer is no, neither MSG or animal extraction are from GMOs, nor is MSG, animal extraction, or animal products/animal DNA in GMOs.   When people refer to Genetically Modified Organisms (GMOs), they are referring to precision plant breeding using genetic engineering (also called GE). It allows plant breeders to take a desirable trait (like resistance to drought, insects, weeds, and disease) from one plant or organism and transfer it to the plant... Read More
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Posted on June 28, 2017
No. MSG, monosodium glutamate, is a chemical additive, certainly not a GMO.
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