QYou have answered, very thoroughly, your reasons for opposing labeling GMO products. You also acknowledge that people have some strong feelings about consuming them. For whatever good or bad reason, some people prefer to avoid them. My question: you un

You have answered, very thoroughly, your reasons for opposing labeling GMO products. You also acknowledge that people have some strong feelings about consuming them. For whatever good or bad reason, some people prefer to avoid them. My question: you understand why people are upset, right?

AExpert Answer

I do.  For far too long, we¹ve let peoples¹ questions and concerns about GMOs go unanswered.  That negligence has resulted in a lot of the apprehension the public is expressing today.  So here we are, late to the conversation, but resolute in our commitment to choice. 

 

There are a number of reasons consumers may prefer to purchase non-GMO--Many of those reasons have been expressed on this website, but concern about food safety or health shouldn¹t be one of them.  This is why we support voluntary, marketing labels for those companies who want to distinguish their non-GM food from their GM food, and so their customers have a choice.  We will continue to highlight available non-GMO labels here, e.g., USDA organic and other non GM private label programs.  Our support for choice is also a major factor in why we are providing information and answering questions about GMOs.  We want consumers to have the facts, so they can make up their own minds. 

Posted on August 15, 2017
No! However, poor nutrition coupled with highly processed foods and a lack of education regarding healthy eating is bad for our kids. As a mother and farmer, I believe the best way to keep my family safe and healthy is to make sure they eat a balanced diet and make good food choices daily. Fresh, healthy ingredients and minimally processed foods that are low in sugar, salt, calories and cholesterol provide kids with the best opportunity for a healthy diet. Agricultural biotechnology... Read More
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Posted on February 9, 2017
A species is defined by the ability to reproduce viable offspring, so any two plants within a species generally have the potential to cross pollinate. Like any good successful mating, it requires the union of male and female contributions at the right time, same place. So absolutely, GE crops have the potential to cross with non-GE crops of the same species—if they manage to get it on through time and space.    So the rules that apply to dogs and teenagers also apply to... Read More
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Posted on March 2, 2017
Here is a set of slides prepared by the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) that discusses the sketch approval process. As the slides indicate, there are four categories of labels that require prior sketch approval: temporary labels, religious exemption, exports with labeling deviations, and special statements and claims. In the situation raised by your question, it is the last category (special statements and claims) that would... Read More
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