QWhy do farmers have to sign a non-disclosure statement?

Why do farmers have to sign a non-disclosure statement?

AExpert Answer

Farmers do not sign non-disclosure agreements. Non-disclosure agreements are contracts between two parties who agree not to disclose essential, confidential information related to their businesses. However, farmers do have to sign technology contracts wherein they agree to a list of terms when using patented seed technology. For example, when we plant enhanced cottonseed, we sign a technology contract in which we agree not to save the seed from the crop to replant it next year. This protects the research-and-development investments of the seed company. After the patents have expired, companies no longer require a technology contract.

Posted on March 9, 2018
Thanks for the question. I believe you are asking about how corn hybrids are produced. For starters, corn plants have both female (silks and cobs) and male parts (tassels). This means that in a field of corn, any plant can fertilize any other plant (hybrid), including itself (inbred).   Breeders create new hybrids by cross pollinating genetics of a specific male inbred (plants with uniform performance) with a specific female inbred. This is done by planting one row of the male... Read More
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Posted on May 4, 2018
There would be more public seed development if genome editing technologies like CRISPR are not regulated as GMOs. Single point mutations are an extension of the undirected mutation breeding that is commonly used now. Having genome editing regulated like conventional plant breeding would allow university plant breeders to use the technology to develop new varieties without the stigmatism of them being GMOs. As for would it allow for more start-up seed companies, this is more doubtful. It is... Read More
Posted on May 4, 2018
There would be more public seed development if genome editing technologies like CRISPR are not regulated as GMOs. Single point mutations are an extension of the undirected mutation breeding that is commonly used now. Having genome editing regulated like conventional plant breeding would allow university plant breeders to use the technology to develop new varieties without the stigmatism of them being GMOs. As for would it allow for more start-up seed companies, this is more doubtful. It is... Read More

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