QWhy are there so many food companies against GMO labeling and willing to pay out millions and billions to block laws passing labeling? It cannot cost as much to just listen to the consumer and give them the information that they are demanding, I for one h

Why are there so many food companies against GMO labeling and willing to pay out millions and billions to block laws passing labeling? It cannot cost as much to just listen to the consumer and give them the information that they are demanding, I for one have stopped buying from these companies and will continue to vote with my dollars until I am heard! Check out app for your phone, buycott.com

AExpert Answer

First, we do hear you and understand the frustration surrounding the issue of GMO labeling. What we’re fighting, though, are bad laws―labeling proposals that actually wouldn’t provide you with accurate information, are intended to disparage food made with GMO ingredients and would harm local businesses. For instance, under these proposed laws, let’s say you purchased a labeled product in a grocery that contains a GM ingredient. If a restaurant used that same product, it wouldn’t have to let you know whether or not the dish you ordered contains GMOs. Additionally, these proposed laws include clauses that would hurt local businesses through bounty-hunter lawsuit provisions and by increasing the cost of food due to the need to reformulate products and segregate supply chains for specific states (additional information available here and here).

 

Finally, as written, these laws would allow only for an ambiguous “may contain” label, a callout that would serve as a warning to consumers about perceived safety and health risks where there are none. Numerous international science societies and health organizations have confirmed the safety of GM crops and foods, not least of which is the American Medical Association. You can find their statement on GM labeling here.

 

Second, you have every right to continue to “vote with your dollars,” and we actually support your choice to do so. We support voluntary labeling and companies’ ability to use marketing labels to differentiate and promote their products, like the "Certified USDA Organic" label.

Posted on March 9, 2018
Sun Pacific oranges are not a GM food, in fact all oranges are not a GM crop. Nearly all foods today have been genetically modified or altered in some way over thousands of years through selective breeding. But there are only 10 commercially available GM crops in the U.S: soybeans, corn (field and sweet), canola, cotton, alfalfa, sugar beets, summer squash, papaya, potatoes and apples. Below is a table outlining what year the 10 crops became commercially available:  ... Read More
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Posted on March 8, 2018
That’s a great question because so many people ‘expect’ there to be a difference and taste is purely a subjective assessment. So the answer is – it depends. Examples when the “look” would be different: Golden Rice: his rice has been engineered to be higher in Beta-carotene, using a gene from maize/corn, to help reduce the incidence of Vitamin A deficiency in developing countries whose Vitamin A content in the diet is so low, that results in blindness,... Read More
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Posted on February 28, 2018
On average, GMOs take 13 years and $130 million of research and development before coming to market. We’ve created the below infographic that outlines this process in more detail: The following infographic includes excerpts from more than 600+ safety assessment studies which assess the health and safety of GMOs. You can also read more about the regulatory review and approval process in Wendelyn Jones, Global Regulatory Affairs, DowDuPont Crop Protection’s response to a... Read More
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