QWhere can the scientific studies be found that confirm aspartame was proven safe when tested on lab rats and monkeys? Also, can you please include a source to the unedited Bressler report to compare those safe studies with?

Where can the scientific studies be found that confirm aspartame was proven safe when tested on lab rats and monkeys? Also, can you please include a source to the unedited Bressler report to compare those safe studies with?

AExpert Answer

Earlier this month, the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) completed a full risk assessment on aspartame and concluded that aspartame and its breakdown products are safe for human consumption at current levels of exposure. To carry out this assessment, EFSA reviewed all available scientific research on aspartame, including both animal and human studies. More information about the assessment can be found here: http://www.efsa.europa.eu/en/press/news/131210.htm.

 

According to the EFSA’s press release, Dr. Alicja Mortensen, Chair of EFSA’s Panel on Food Additives and Nutrient Sources Added to Foods, said, “This opinion represents one of the most comprehensive risk assessments of aspartame ever undertaken. It’s a step forward in strengthening consumer confidence in the scientific underpinning of the EU food safety system and the regulation of food additives.”

 

For more information on aspartame, check out EFSA’s topic page and FAQ. Cathy Enright, Executive Director of the Council of Biotechnology Information, also explores aspartame in this response.  

 

We are unclear what you are asking with regard to the Bressler study and how it is related to GMOs. Please feel free to clarify and resubmit a new question.

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