Qwhen do i know when my gmo is done cooking

when do i know when my gmo is done cooking

AExpert Answer

When people refer to Genetically Modified Organisms (GMOs), they are referring to precision plant breeding using genetic engineering. It allows plant breeders to take a desirable trait (like resistance to drought, insects, weeds, and disease) from one plant or organism and transfer it to the plant they want to improve, as well as make a change to an existing trait in a plant they are developing.

 

As for cooking processes, any food products that may contain GMO ingredients (such as corn syrup that was derived from a GE corn plant) OR a GE whole food like the Hawaiian papaya variety engineered to resist the RingSpot Virus, would be cooked, eaten and enjoyed in the exact same way as it conventional or (if available) conventional or organic counterpart. In other words, these foods are nutritionally equivalent. In a more detailed response on the topic, Angela Culler, Lead of Compositional Biology Center at Monsanto states,

“…before a GM crop is commercialized, extensive scientific analyses are conducted, including a compositional analysis, that contribute to the overall safety assessment of these crops. These are very comprehensive studies that include multiple geographies that span up to 1000 miles to get a variety of environmental and soil conditions, with multiple plots within a location and analysis of up to 80 analytes. The overwhelming conclusion of these studies is that the composition of the GM crops is nutritionally equivalent to the non-modified variant, and that factors such as environment have a much bigger effect on composition.”

Posted on July 30, 2018
Genetic engineering (GE) touches on the routine life of billions of people (but not everyone). Food, clothes, and medicine are commonly made with the help of genetically engineered organisms. Certain medicines, like insulin, could only be mass-produced this way. Fiber for clothes is made less expensive thanks to GE cotton plants. You also PROBABLY sometimes eat plants with a few engineered genes, depending on where you live. But genetic engineering isn’t just for making new or better... Read More
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Posted on June 25, 2018
Thank you for your question and interest, it is great you are a supporter of sciences. The traditional home gardening seed outlets do not sell/market/offer GMO crop seeds, one would have to work through a grower seed dealer/distributor, which would require appropriate licensing and a contract agreement. So anyone can purchase GM seed varieties – it simply requires going through a farm supply company, getting the required licensing and signing a contract. But typical gardener retail... Read More
Posted on April 25, 2018
First, the question is wrongly framed; it’s not true that there’s less “usage” of GMOs in developing countries. In a 2016 report, the International Service for the Acquisition of Agri-biotech Applications (ISAAA) reported that “of the top five countries growing 91 percent of biotech crops, three are developing countries (Brazil, Argentina, and India).” The other two were the U.S. and Canada. Although the U.S. led biotech crop planting in 2016... Read More
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