Qwhen do gmos sleep

when do gmos sleep

AExpert Answer

GMO plants, like all other plants, do not “sleep” in the sense that you and I as mammals sleep. However, plants do have natural processes that may be cyclic or seasonal, indicating a cycle or rhythm to their growth and life. This is not technically “sleeping” but let me give you a couple of examples of what I mean. 

 

Some plants have a type of metabolism known as CAM (Crassulacean Acid Metabolism). Plants which have CAM close the pores on their leaves to limit water loss during the day and at night, open the pores open to admit carbon dioxide. The carbon is stored at night, and then during the day it is used for photosynthesis. Although I am not aware of any currently commercial GMO plants with CAM metabolism, some plants with this metabolism include pineapple and cactus.

 

There is also a seasonal rhythm to many plants’ growth. Plants use various signals from their own growth, and from environmental signals such as day length, to trigger various growth and reproduction processes like flowering, seed maturity and seed shedding from the plant. Row crop plants such as soybean, corn, canola and cotton, regardless of whether it is a genetically modified type or a conventional type, exhibit these seasonal changes in plant growth.

 

When testing a GMO plant, scientists evaluate many parameters of plant growth and development from germination through final seed production. Plants exhibit natural variability in all growth characteristics. By assessing these characteristics and comparing them to a non-GMO type, scientists can determine if plant growth and physiological processes remain within the natural variation expected except for any targeted effects of the modified trait and trait product. These assessments would also reveal if the seasonal changes in a plant’s growth and development had changed. In this way, we can determine if anything is different about the GMO that is of concern for food, feed or processing.

 

To conclude, plants don’t sleep as you or I do, but they do follow natural cyclic or seasonal patterns. 

Posted on February 28, 2018
It all depends on who ‘we’ is. If ‘we’ is referring to farmers, then the answer is definitely making money. In 2014, one analysis of this issue examined the results of 147 studies on the economic impacts of GM crops, finding that on average, farmer profits rose by 68 percent. This assessment included studies of large GM crop production in countries such as the USA, Brazil and Argentina, but also small landholders with less than five acres of land in India, China and... Read More
Posted on March 9, 2018
Thanks for the question. I believe you are asking about how corn hybrids are produced. For starters, corn plants have both female (silks and cobs) and male parts (tassels). This means that in a field of corn, any plant can fertilize any other plant (hybrid), including itself (inbred).   Breeders create new hybrids by cross pollinating genetics of a specific male inbred (plants with uniform performance) with a specific female inbred. This is done by planting one row of the male... Read More
Answer:
Posted on May 4, 2018
There would be more public seed development if genome editing technologies like CRISPR are not regulated as GMOs. Single point mutations are an extension of the undirected mutation breeding that is commonly used now. Having genome editing regulated like conventional plant breeding would allow university plant breeders to use the technology to develop new varieties without the stigmatism of them being GMOs. As for would it allow for more start-up seed companies, this is more doubtful. It is... Read More