QWhat do yo do when GMO seed gets blown on to a farm where the farmer was using non-GMO seed. The famers crop is then infected by GMO seed, what recourse will you pursue?Also how can you prevent this from ocurring?

What do yo do when GMO seed gets blown on to a farm where the farmer was using non-GMO seed. The famers crop is then infected by GMO seed, what recourse will you pursue? Also how can you prevent this from ocurring?

AExpert Answer

In the situation that you described, we would not take any legal action. In fact, we have a long-standing public commitment that “it has never been, nor will it be, Monsanto’s policy to exercise its patent rights where trace amounts of our patented seeds or traits are present in a farmer’s fields as a result of inadvertent means.”

 

In reality, farmers have been successfully growing conventional, organic and GM crops―sometimes even on the same farm―for years through good communication, cooperation, flexibility and mutual respect for each other’s practices and requirements. Since coexistence strategies can be different depending on the crops and practices used, experts recommend that neighbors work together to develop coexistence plans on a case-by-case basis.

 

Since the beginning of the federal National Organic Program (NOP), I am not aware of any certified organic farm that has lost its USDA certification due to accidental mixing with GM seed.

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GMO Answers provides the facts that answer questions related to biotechnology, GM crops and agriculture. We work to ensure that the content and answers provided by experts and companies are accurate and therefore do not present opinions about GMOs, simply facts. GMO Answers is a community focused on constructive discussion about GMOs in order to have open conversations about agriculture and GMOs. This website is funded by the Council for Biotechnology Information. The Council... Read More
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