QTopic: Why GMOs can never be safe article. http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2013/08/06/genetic-modification.aspx?e_cid=20130811_SNL_MS_1&utm_source=snl&utm_medium=email&utm_content=ms1&utm_campaign=20130811It appears that there is clear

Topic: Why GMOs can never be safe article. http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2013/08/06/genetic-modification.aspx?e_cid=20130811_SNL_MS_1&utm_source=snl&utm_medium=email&utm_content=ms1&utm_campaign=20130811 It appears that there is clearly enough concern for mandatory labelling if not a ban altogether on this technology. There is no long term study showing this to be safe and plenty of red flags to show a precautionary approach. With the resistance to mandatory labelling, suspicion only increases. Are we not seeing a situation like the tobacco industry went through in terms of safety?

AExpert Answer

Before answering your question, I think it’s important to place the reference you provided from mercola.com, an alternative medicine website business, into context. Mercola.com is owned by Joseph Mercola, who has been the subject of criticism for years by the regulatory, medical and scientific communities for making unsubstantiated claims about the ability of the products he sells to detect, prevent and treat disease. He warns parents not to vaccinate their children, advises women not to get mammograms and opposes fluoridation and of course, rallies against GMOs. On each of these issues the overwhelming preponderance of scientific evidence does not support his admonitions.

 

 

Contrary to the information on the Mercola website, GMOs are as safe as other foods. Hundreds of independent studies including long term feeding studies, regulatory officials around the world, and renowned institutions recognize that GM technology does not present any new food safety or health risk to humans or animals. The few studies and articles that have made negative safety or health claims about GMOs have been discredited by the global scientific community. Additional information on this topic:

 


Our position on mandatory labeling is not popular with some; however, we believe that mandatory labeling would convey to US consumers that the food derived from the crops grown by the farmers who plant our seeds is somehow less safe or nutritious than food produced with organic seeds—a message that is simply untrue. Statements by the Food & Drug Administration as well as the American Medical Association, the American Association for the Advancement of Science and Scientific American explain why mandatory labeling should not be required on GM foods. These statements can be accessed through the links below:

 

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has consistently held that:

“…there is no significant difference between foods produced using bio-engineering, as a class, and their conventional counterparts.”
http://www.fda.gov/Food/GuidanceRegulation/GuidanceDocumentsRegulatoryInformation/LabelingNutrition/ucm059098.htm

 

The American Medical Association stated in June 2012: 

“There is no scientific justification for special labeling of bioengineered foods, as a class, and that voluntary labeling is without value unless it is accompanied by focused consumer education.”
https://ssl3.ama-assn.org/apps/ecomm/PolicyFinderForm.pl?site=www.ama-assn.org&uri=/resources/doc/PolicyFinder/policyfiles/HnE/H-480.958.HTM

 

The American Association for the Advancement of Sciences stated in October 2012:

“The FDA does not require labeling of a food based on the specific genetic modification procedure used in the development of its input crops. Legally mandating such a label can only serve to mislead and falsely alarm consumers.”
http://www.aaas.org/news/releases/2012/media/AAAS_GM_statement.pdf

 

The Scientific American stated in September 2013:

“Instead of providing people with useful information, mandatory GMO labels would only intensify the misconception that so-called Frankenfoods endanger people's health.”
http://www.scientificamerican.com/article.cfm?id=labels-for-gmo-foods

Posted on December 7, 2017
The term “GMO” typically refers to crops or animals that, through genetic engineering, have had a gene (or a few genes) from a different species inserted into their genome. This is by design to improve a crop or animal with genetic engineering. In fact, me and my colleagues recently published a paper on this very topic that addresses this very topic and gives more details on the plant selection practices used for GE crops.   However, you pick up on something very... Read More
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Posted on December 7, 2017
Nearly all foods today have been genetically modified or altered in some way over thousands of years through selective breeding. However, there are only 10 commercially available GMO crops in the U.S: soybeans, corn (field and sweet), canola, cotton, alfalfa, sugar beets, summer squash, papaya, potatoes and apples.   Below is a table outlining what year the nine crops became commercially available:   Squash 1995 Cotton 1996... Read More
Posted on November 17, 2017
When people refer to Genetically Modified Organisms (GMOs), they are referring to precision plant breeding using genetic engineering. It allows plant breeders to take a desirable trait (like resistance to drought, insects, weeds, and disease) from one plant or organism and transfer it to the plant they want to improve, as well as make a change to an existing trait in a plant they are developing. You may have also heard of agricultural biotechnology or biotech seeds.... Read More
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