Qsometimes I get confused on the term gmo is there any way to shorten what a gmo is?

sometimes I get confused on the term gmo is there any way to shorten what a gmo is?

AExpert Answer

 

The term “GMO” certainly can be confusing. “GMO” stands for genetically modified organism, so it is the “short version” of that longer term. In addition to the term GMO, some groups use the term “GM” (standing for “genetically modified”) to describe GM crops and GMO crops (which are the same thing). GMOs are used for a variety of purposes, such as to produce human insulinvitaminsvaccines or enzymes used in cheeses, fermented beverages and starch products. GMO Answers is focused on GM crops for plant agriculture.

 

When the term “GMO” is used to describe food crops, it is used to describe a plant developed through a specific process in which a copy of a desired gene or section of genetic material from one plant or organism is placed in another plant. These crops are created to achieve a desired trait, such as resistance to an insect or improvement to a ripening process, in order to better meet a customer’s market need. The only GMOs commercially available in the U.S. are the following eight crops: soybeans, corn (field and sweet), papaya, canola, cotton, alfalfa, sugar beets and summer squash.

 

Both traditional plant breeding and genetic engineering involve altering the genes of a plant to make a better variety.  Breeding involves random mixing of genes from two parent plants which results in a new variety that contains the desired characteristic and possibly other unwanted characteristics.  A GM plant results from the direct transfer of an intended gene that gives the desired characteristic to the new variety.  The graphic below discusses the differences between traditional plant breeding and genetic engineering.

Methods of Plant Breeding

Posted on January 31, 2018
Thank you for your question. There are various aspects of your question. I assume your question refers to the use of Agrobacterium rhizogenes by scientists to intentionally transfer genes from the bacterium to plants. Infection and DNA transfer from this bacterium occurs in nature all the time to cause disease. Such transformed plants are not classified as GMOs since transfer occurred naturally. If this is done by scientists then it would be classified as a GMO. Rules and... Read More
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Posted on March 1, 2018
I’m a Monsanto scientist who has more than 20 years of experience with genetic modification of plants. I will try to answer your question, even though I don’t ever do experiments on animals, certainly not on humans, of course! Can humans be genetically modified…but a much bigger question is should humans be genetically modified? There are two ways to think about genetic modification of humans (or any animal). One way is modification of somatic cells, and the other is the... Read More
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Posted on May 10, 2017
The simple answer is that 20+ years of composition assessments of GMO crops have demonstrated that crop composition is not appreciably affected by the GM process (1). In addition, data collected through that time have indicated that general factors such as the growth environment can contribute to notable variation in component levels (2). Plant agglutinins (or lectins) and amylase inhibitors are examples of anti-nutritional compounds that may be present in crops. The relevance of such a... Read More