Qsometimes I get confused on the term gmo is there any way to shorten what a gmo is?

sometimes I get confused on the term gmo is there any way to shorten what a gmo is?

AExpert Answer

 

The term “GMO” certainly can be confusing. “GMO” stands for genetically modified organism, so it is the “short version” of that longer term. In addition to the term GMO, some groups use the term “GM” (standing for “genetically modified”) to describe GM crops and GMO crops (which are the same thing). GMOs are used for a variety of purposes, such as to produce human insulinvitaminsvaccines or enzymes used in cheeses, fermented beverages and starch products. GMO Answers is focused on GM crops for plant agriculture.

 

When the term “GMO” is used to describe food crops, it is used to describe a plant developed through a specific process in which a copy of a desired gene or section of genetic material from one plant or organism is placed in another plant. These crops are created to achieve a desired trait, such as resistance to an insect or improvement to a ripening process, in order to better meet a customer’s market need. The only GMOs commercially available in the U.S. are the following eight crops: soybeans, corn (field and sweet), papaya, canola, cotton, alfalfa, sugar beets and summer squash.

 

Both traditional plant breeding and genetic engineering involve altering the genes of a plant to make a better variety.  Breeding involves random mixing of genes from two parent plants which results in a new variety that contains the desired characteristic and possibly other unwanted characteristics.  A GM plant results from the direct transfer of an intended gene that gives the desired characteristic to the new variety.  The graphic below discusses the differences between traditional plant breeding and genetic engineering.

Methods of Plant Breeding

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An "LMO" (Living Modified Organism) is basically a GMO that is alive and capable of passing on its genes to a subsequent generation. In most situations, the terms LMO and GMO are essentially synonymous, but neither term is really used by most biotechnologists! More on that below.    The term LMO was used in the Cartegena Protocol (basically a big document that came out of an international convention several years ago, more detailed info here.)   The reason we as... Read More
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Posted on October 6, 2017
Biotechnology as a discipline focuses on understanding molecular biology and has applications in medicine/health, environmental science, industrial products and agriculture. Biotechnology is widely used in all these sectors. I will focus my answer on agricultural biotechnology.   In many countries (e.g., Brazil, Canada, India, and the United States) a significant amount of agricultural research, especially basic research in molecular biology, is conducted by governmental agricultural... Read More
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The principle reason that GM products such as Arctic apples are not available in Germany or any other country of the European Union is due to the GMO labeling legislation in place there. Presently, any food product that contains GM ingredients of greater than 0.9 percent has to be labelled as being a GM food product. The environmental non-governmental organizations have led extensive public relation campaigns to convince European consumers that GM labels are to be viewed as a warning, or... Read More
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