Q Many farmers have chosen to avoid planting the GMO seeds, for whatever reason, and aren't given the choice to extract them once the seeds have infiltrated into their crops. How is it legal to fine or sue a farmer after discovering a patented GMO on his/h

Many farmers have chosen to avoid planting the GMO seeds, for whatever reason, and aren't given the choice to extract them once the seeds have infiltrated into their crops. How is it legal to fine or sue a farmer after discovering a patented GMO on his/her land? Wouldn't it be more logical to permit the farmers to sue the owner of the GMO for intruding upon their crops?

AExpert Answer

This is a question that we've seen several times on GMO Answers, and a misperception that we’d very much like to correct. None of our companies has sued a farmer because of the inadvertent presence of patented biotech traits in the farmer's field.

 

We respect a farmer’s right to choose the best seed for him or her. In fact, our company is a supplier of non-biotech seed. Our agronomy and sales teams work with farmer customers to match the right seed—whether that's biotech or not—and the best management practices to their specific growing conditions. And what we see in the field is that farmers are successfully growing all types of crops (conventional, organic, biotech, specialty), sometimes even on the same farm, through good communication, cooperation, flexibility and mutual respect for each other’s practices and requirements. 

Posted on August 15, 2017
  On average, the recent research that has been conducted on GMOs, on a per product basis is calculated to be an average of $130 Million (and 13 years). This is a per product average, so each product that reaches commercialization in a given year would also cost something similar to this value.   Please see below for additional helpful resources: The Cost and time involved in the discovery, development and authorization of a new plant biotechnology derived trait by Phillips... Read More
Posted on March 2, 2017
These are definitely questions that many people are asking and researching to come up with answers.  In a day and age when a person can go to their smart phone to find a restaurant or search for directions, our society is definitely accustomed to finding answers quickly.   Unfortunately, complex issues take more time for the scientific community to research and develop answers. History is full of examples such as genetics, which started with the work of Gregor Mendel in 1856 and... Read More
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Posted on May 6, 2017
A gene with a desirable trait can be moved from one organism to another organism as a means to change it. The traditional way is through selective breeding, which is slow, time consuming, inefficient, and transfers more than one gene, so other unexpected and unwanted traits can cause problems. But genes also can be moved in a laboratory, resulting in what has been called a genetically modified (“transgenic”) organism (GMO). GM technology moves only one gene, eliminating other,... Read More
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