QIs it true that antigmo campaigns are causing wide scale death in 3rd world nations? Could you explain the situation to me, I used to think gmo was a bad idea until someone told me this.

Is it true that antigmo campaigns are causing wide scale death in 3rd world nations? Could you explain the situation to me, I used to think gmo was a bad idea until someone told me this.

AExpert Answer

Many developing countries, including the one I am from, Honduras, are benefiting from GM and biotechnology. Corn is one of the staple crops in Honduras; however, almost 50 percent of the corn is imported. As a result, governmental food-security strategies include adoption of hybrid and GM corn to improve national production. In Honduras, anti-GMO activists have not been as vocal as they are in other parts of the world. In contrast, anti-GMO activists have been extremely vocal in the case of Golden Rice — unfortunately, at the expense of human lives.

 

Over the 12 years it has taken (and still takes) to develop and commercialize Golden Rice, approximately 8 million children have died of vitamin A deficiency (VAD), 1 to 2 million continue to die every year and over 500K go blind every year. Only 50 g of Golden Rice would supply 60 percent of the daily requirement of beta-carotene, yet activists continue to decry its potential, up to and including destroying the very scientific plots that could answer the question of whether it would assist in the fight against VAD.

Posted on March 2, 2018
While biodiversity is an important issue, the relationship to agriculture and to agricultural crop protection chemicals is a bit complex.  First of all, since its beginnings 10,000 or more years ago, farming has been quite intentionally an effort to make one plant species dominant in any given tended area or field.  From the plant biodiversity side, the struggle has always been with other plant species that are particularly “weedy” which means they are well adapted to... Read More
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Posted on March 9, 2018
Hello, and thank you for your question! Scientists commonly use genetically engineering (GE) to add and subtract genes from ALL sorts of plants, from common weeds to potatoes from the Andes. Most GE is performed only to learn how plants work. While it’s relatively simple to change a plant’s genetics, it’s difficult and expensive to actually improve a plant’s genetics. Thus, only the most “important” crops are targets for GE. Smaller improvements are... Read More
Answer:
Posted on March 8, 2018
Hello, and thank you for your question! Scientists commonly use genetically engineering (GE) to add and subtract genes from ALL sorts of plants, from common weeds to potatoes from the Andes. Most GE is performed only to learn how plants work. While it’s relatively simple to change a plant’s genetics, it’s difficult and expensive to actually improve a plant’s genetics. Thus, only the most “important” crops are targets for GE. Smaller improvements are... Read More

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