QIf the technology is safe enough why should labeling be shied away?

If the technology is safe enough why should labeling be shied away?

AExpert Answer

We understand this point of view, but here’s the issue. Labels are intended to clarify not confuse. Yes, in the case of GMOs, they have the potential to be very misleading. I’ve examined this topic and developed a post that may be of interest on the Truth About Trade & Technology blog, available here: http://www.truthabouttrade.org/2013/08/22/food-labels-maxed-out/.

 

Below is an excerpt which addresses your question:

 

“The purpose of a food label is to help consumers make smart decisions about what to buy and eat. But what if these labels confused people instead of informed them? Or worse yet, what if labels actually misled consumers?

 

......

 

The dangers of deceptive labeling aren’t a speculative assertion, but rather the main point of a recent paper by Juanjuan Zhang, a marketing professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. ‘Mandatory disclosure of GMOs in food products lowers consumers’ perceived GMO safety,’ she writes in ‘Policy and Inference: The Case of Product Labeling.’

 

Zhang’s research reveals that the mere act of labeling food that contains GMOs is deceptive. It causes consumers to suspect that GMOs are dangerous, even though the safety of biotech food is beyond reasonable doubt, as organizations ranging from the American Medical Association to the World Health Organization have determined.

 

......

 

Supporters of the “just label it” movement like to talk about “the right to know.” Yet Zhang’s scholarship shows that consumer behavior is more complicated than a political slogan. Labels possess the power to mislead. That means our lawmakers must mandate them sparingly, and not just because a few special interest groups want the federal government to help them obtain a competitive advantage in the food market.”

 

If you don’t feel as if your response has been answered, we invite you to submit a new question here: http://gmoanswers.com/ask-your-question.

Posted on May 6, 2018
The UPC (Universal Product Code) is a barcode (which has numbers beneath it) which identifies the product and the manufacturer. I think you may be thinking of the PLU (Price Look Up) code which is the 4 or 5 digit number on produce used to link a price with an item. The PLU code is a voluntary program that assigns numbers to produce items, this helps cashiers identify the correct price for a produce item. Growers/Packers can use the number "9" prefix to this 4-digit numeric code to... Read More
Answer:
Posted on May 10, 2017
The simple answer is that 20+ years of composition assessments of GMO crops have demonstrated that crop composition is not appreciably affected by the GM process (1). In addition, data collected through that time have indicated that general factors such as the growth environment can contribute to notable variation in component levels (2). Plant agglutinins (or lectins) and amylase inhibitors are examples of anti-nutritional compounds that may be present in crops. The relevance of such a... Read More
Posted on March 18, 2018
We invite you to check out a similar question on the topic of GM food labeling that has been answered here.
Answer:

Explore More Topics