QHow many days the glyphosate still active in the soil

How many days the glyphosate still active in the soil

AExpert Answer

The soil half-life of glyphosate is approximately 47 days (with a range of 2 to nearly 200 days depending on soil type and various environmental conditions). But it is not active for a vast majority of that time. In order for glyphosate to be active as a herbicide, it must first (obviously) enter the plant. But glyphosate binds very tightly to soil particles almost immediately upon reaching the soil, and pesticides are not absorbed by plants while they are bound to the soil. Glyphosate is degraded relatively quickly by soil microorganisms, so there is almost never enough available glyphosate in the soil to cause plant injury. So although glyphosate can be detected in the soil for quite some time after application, it has no practical soil activity as a herbicide. We can spray glyphosate to control emerged weeds and plant a new crop on the very same day in most cases without risk of injuring the crop.

Posted on March 2, 2018
Believe it or not, I jump at opportunities to talk about aquatic life, so thank you for your interest. I developed a passion for aquatic animals early on and remain grateful that I have managed to explore my passions in ecotoxicology for over 25 years! This is a very general question in terms of pesticide/herbicide options that are commercially available and as well as applications. I will focus on glyphosate and dicamba specifically. Two active ingredients in herbicidal formulations that... Read More
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Posted on March 2, 2018
Believe it or not, I jump at opportunities to talk about aquatic life, so thank you for your interest. I developed a passion for aquatic animals early on and remain grateful that I have managed to explore my passions in ecotoxicology for over 25 years! This discussion will focus on glyphosate and dicamba as examples of herbicides that are used to manage weed control on farms cultivating GM crops. As background, glyphosate binds strongly to soils limiting bioavailability and glyphosate rapidly... Read More
Answer:
Posted on March 2, 2018
Believe it or not, I jump at opportunities to talk about aquatic life, so thank you for your interest. I developed a passion for aquatic animals early on and remain grateful that I have managed to explore my passions in ecotoxicology for over 25 years! Many different short-term and long-term aquatic studies are required for pesticides during the registration process and these studies are used to evaluate if there are potential impacts to aquatic life. These required studies test for potential... Read More
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