QHow does wheat gluten relate to GMO?

How does wheat gluten relate to GMO?

AExpert Answer

Thank you for taking the time to submit your question about GMOs and gluten. While there is no genetically modified wheat currently commercialized anywhere in the world, and GMOs are not related to gluten, I appreciate this opportunity to share some resources where you can learn more about gluten and why it is such an important protein in wheat and other crops.

 

Gluten is a protein not just found in wheat, but also in other crops, including rye and barley, which helps foods like bread, maintain their shape. The Wheat Foods Council, a leading source of science-based information on wheat and wheat foods nutrition, has created a resource page where you can find several facts, studies and other information on gluten: http://wheatfoods.org/resources.

 

In addition, if you have concerns about gluten sensitivity, I encourage you to visit the Celiac Foundation’s website where you can find information on these issues: https://celiac.org/.

 

If you would like more information about wheat, the U.S. wheat industry or different classes and varieties of wheat, you may want to visit www.wheatworld.org, www.uswheat.org or Festival of Breads - wheat facts

AExpert Answer

The short and easy answer is that they are not related. Gluten is a protein in wheat and is said to be the glue that holds or binds bread together while giving it a desired chewy texture. Because wheat gluten cannot be tolerated with those having celiac disease, it has received enormous attention in the past several years mostly as a gluten-free diet craze for both celiac sufferers as well as the general population. While wheat is the primary grain containing gluten, it is also found in smaller amounts in rye and barley.  

 

Genetically modified or GMO wheat is not currently in the food supply. Some trials have been conducted on the wheat plant to make it resistant to herbicides but these trials are still in the experimental stages. Currently, the only genetically modified products on the market are corn, cotton, soybeans, sugar beets, papaya, alfalfa, canola, squash and potato. A GM apple has been approved to be grown and will be coming to market.

Posted on January 31, 2018
Thank you for your question. There are various aspects of your question. I assume your question refers to the use of Agrobacterium rhizogenes by scientists to intentionally transfer genes from the bacterium to plants. Infection and DNA transfer from this bacterium occurs in nature all the time to cause disease. Such transformed plants are not classified as GMOs since transfer occurred naturally. If this is done by scientists then it would be classified as a GMO. Rules and... Read More
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Posted on March 1, 2018
I’m a Monsanto scientist who has more than 20 years of experience with genetic modification of plants. I will try to answer your question, even though I don’t ever do experiments on animals, certainly not on humans, of course! Can humans be genetically modified…but a much bigger question is should humans be genetically modified? There are two ways to think about genetic modification of humans (or any animal). One way is modification of somatic cells, and the other is the... Read More
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Posted on May 10, 2017
The simple answer is that 20+ years of composition assessments of GMO crops have demonstrated that crop composition is not appreciably affected by the GM process (1). In addition, data collected through that time have indicated that general factors such as the growth environment can contribute to notable variation in component levels (2). Plant agglutinins (or lectins) and amylase inhibitors are examples of anti-nutritional compounds that may be present in crops. The relevance of such a... Read More