Qhow common are Gmos?

how common are Gmos?

AExpert Answer

This is a great question, and we want to start by sharing information about how GM seeds came to be used in agriculture. Farmers have intentionally changed the genetic makeup of all the crops they have grown and the livestock they have raised since domestic agriculture began 10,000 years ago. Every fruit, vegetable and grain that is commercially available today has been altered by human hands, including organic and heirloom seeds.

In the late 20th century, advances in technology enabled us to expand the genetic diversity of crops. For years, university, government and company scientists intensively researched and refined this process. A major result has been GM seeds that maintain or increase the yield of crops while requiring less land and fewer inputs, both of which lessen the impact of agriculture on the environment and reduce costs for farmers.

 

 

Biotechnology in plant agriculture has come to mean the process of intentionally making a copy of a gene for a desired trait in one plant or organism and using it in another plant. The result is a GMO (genetically modified organism).

 

To answer your question, there are currently eight crops commercially available from GM seeds in the United States: corn, soybeans, cotton, canola, alfalfa, sugar beets, papaya and squash. No commercially available crops in the United States were created by nature alone. We humans, over our history, have altered all of our crops, often for taste or yield or disease resistance.

 

However, it is important to note that while agricultural GMOs are often the most talked about, GM technology is quite prevalent. Did you know the following products are GMOs, too?

 

If you have any additional questions, please ask at http://www.gmoanswers.com/ask. You might also be interested in our Explore section: http://www.gmoanswers.com/explore.

Posted on April 18, 2018
GMO Answers provides the facts that answer questions related to biotechnology, GM crops and agriculture. We work to ensure that the content and answers provided by experts and companies are accurate and therefore do not present opinions about GMOs, simply facts. GMO Answers is a community focused on constructive discussion about GMOs in order to have open conversations about agriculture and GMOs. This website is funded by the Council for Biotechnology Information. The Council... Read More
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When glyphosate is applied to plants (e.g., crops or weeds) a certain percentage is absorbed and transported throughout the plant. The amount absorbed is variable depending on the application rate and the type of plant. Very little of the absorbed glyphosate is degraded by the plant and cannot be removed. Its persistence in plants is also variable. Federal regulatory agencies have established allowable limits for glyphosate residues in many different crops to protect human and animal health.... Read More
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Posted on April 25, 2018
First, the question is wrongly framed; it’s not true that there’s less “usage” of GMOs in developing countries. In a 2016 report, the International Service for the Acquisition of Agri-biotech Applications (ISAAA) reported that “of the top five countries growing 91 percent of biotech crops, three are developing countries (Brazil, Argentina, and India).” The other two were the U.S. and Canada. Although the U.S. led biotech crop planting in 2016... Read More
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