QGmo manufacturers claim their products will lower the use of pesticides. However, pesticide use is increasing due to bt resistance from pests and increasing populations of non-targeted pests. How do manufacturers of GMOs plan to combat the increased cos

Gmo manufacturers claim their products will lower the use of pesticides. However, pesticide use is increasing due to bt resistance from pests and increasing populations of non-targeted pests. How do manufacturers of GMOs plan to combat the increased costs to farming resulting from higher costs due to decreased productivity and increased pesticide costs?

AExpert Answer

Planting of Bt crops has significantly lowered the use of insecticides in cotton and corn. After over a decade of widespread Bt crop use, it is not too surprising that some insect pest populations are now evolving resistance to this trait. Consequently, farmers may be using insecticides to combat these Bt-resistant pests. It is important to note, though, that Bt-resistant insects are not the only reason for using an insecticide in addition to Bt corn hybrids; some farmers use the two tools in combination to manage secondary insect pests and also to try to prevent resistance from evolving. While I cannot speak for the companies that provide pesticides and seed, many of them have a long history of providing cost-effective technologies to help farmers. Pest resistance to pesticides is not a new phenomenon. Today's farmers are savvy businessmen and businesswomen in addition to being skilled biologists, and they've been dealing with pesticide-resistant weeds, diseases and insects for many years. Industry, USDA, and university scientists are always studying innovative ways to manage pests, and I have no doubt that we will continue to find economical and environmentally friendly solutions to future pest problems.

Posted on April 20, 2018
When glyphosate is applied to plants (e.g., crops or weeds) a certain percentage is absorbed and transported throughout the plant. The amount absorbed is variable depending on the application rate and the type of plant. Very little of the absorbed glyphosate is degraded by the plant and cannot be removed. Its persistence in plants is also variable. Federal regulatory agencies have established allowable limits for glyphosate residues in many different crops to protect human and animal health.... Read More
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Posted on April 25, 2018
First, the question is wrongly framed; it’s not true that there’s less “usage” of GMOs in developing countries. In a 2016 report, the International Service for the Acquisition of Agri-biotech Applications (ISAAA) reported that “of the top five countries growing 91 percent of biotech crops, three are developing countries (Brazil, Argentina, and India).” The other two were the U.S. and Canada. Although the U.S. led biotech crop planting in 2016... Read More
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Posted on March 21, 2018
Thank you for your question. This question has been previously been answered in this response. A snippet of is included below: “Jim Gaffney, PhD, Strategy Lead of Biotech Affairs and Regulatory at DuPont Pioneer says this: “In short, yes, genetically modified (GM) crops are one tool with great potential for helping feed the growing population. The challenge is not just one of increased productivity though, but also of improving prosperity for millions of smallholder farmers and... Read More
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