Qcan I see a chart of the nutrition value of GMO vs non GMO fruits and vegetables ?

can I see a chart of the nutrition value of GMO vs non GMO fruits and vegetables ?

AExpert Answer

Hi, thank you for your question.

 

You might be interested to know that there are only eight GM crops currently grown in the United States: corn, soybeans, cotton, canola, alfalfa, sugar beets, papaya, and squash.  We conduct composition studies for all GM crops that follow OECD guidelines. In order to provide a chart illustrating this we thought you might be interested in one of the remarkable GM success stories such as the development of GM papaya. The use of GM has been credited with saving the papaya industry from devastation caused by viruses.

 

Papaya is a tropical fruit crop that is an excellent source of vitamin C and beta-carotene (the precursor of vitamin A). It has been shown in an independent study* that levels of vitamins and other nutrients in GM and non-GM papayas are the same.  We hope that the charts for these important nutrients, vitamin C and beta-carotene, will convince you of the similarity of the GM and non-GM papayas.

 

nutrition papaya

 

Over 20 years of scientific research have firmly established GM and non-GMO crops have the same levels of nutrients and vitamins.  This is why organizations such as the World Health Organization, the American Medical Association, and the American Dietetics Association have declared that GM crops are as safe and as wholesome as conventional crops.

 

  • *Jiao et al (2010). Journal of Food Composition and Analysis. 23, 640
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