QAre GMOs tested beyond 90 days by the agro companies? Meaning, do you report data on test conducted beyond 90 days?

Are GMOs tested beyond 90 days by the agro companies? Meaning, do you report data on test conducted beyond 90 days?

AExpert Answer

We conduct 90-day rat feeding studies on new biotech traits, which is consistent with the duration of safety studies conducted for many types of products. It’s important to note that this type of study is one component of the comprehensive testing that we conduct. The biotech process, from initial concept to commercialization, can take up to 13 years; more than 50 studies on food, feed and environmental safety are conducted in the regulatory-science phase of the process alone. 

 

One of the most important parts of the safety testing we do is composition testing. In these studies, a GM plant is grown in the field along with non-GM plants, and the grain is harvested. The grain is then subjected to analytical chemistry testing to determine the concentration of the individual components we know are there. The concentrations of the different components are then compared between the GM and the non-GM corn plants. There is usually some variability in the concentrations of some of the different components, but that is nearly always observed in crops bred with traditional methods, too. Therefore, the historic concentrations from non-GM crops are available at an open-access website for further comparison. These methods have been very effective in demonstrating that GM technology does not introduce composition variability, and that the grains obtained from these plants are “substantially equivalent” to those obtained from non-GM crops.

 

The 90-day rat studies you are asking about have been conducted to assess the possibility that unintended changes could have occurred during the development process that may not have been detected in the chemical analysis. To date, no adverse effects associated with consuming diets containing GM grain have been observed in any of these studies.

Posted on July 21, 2017
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Posted on March 28, 2017
Thanks for the question, which I will address in two ways here.   1. What are three ways that organisms are modified by scientists? Here I will focus only on plants.   a. Agrobacterium: Agrobacterium tumefaciens (Agro) is a naturally occurring soil organism that causes a disease in plants called crown gall disease. In the late 1970s, Mary-Dell Chilton discovered that Agro actually transfers genes (DNA) from the Agro to the plant cell, where it becomes integrated into the plant... Read More
Posted on March 2, 2017
First of all, to clarify – hybridization is part of conventional breeding and conventional breeding uses hybridization to create new combinations of genes from parent varieties. For example, a disease-resistant wheat variety may be hybridized to a variety that makes flour better suited for making whole wheat bread. This is a common goal of most conventional breeding programs. It typically involves taking pollen from one parent and using it to fertilize another parent. The... Read More