QWith all your 'Messing with nature', can you be sure that no negative impact on the future of our planet will be caused by your Genetic Modification, surely blind forced evolution is a dangerous game to play?

With all your 'Messing with nature', can you be sure that no negative impact on the future of our planet will be caused by your Genetic Modification, surely blind forced evolution is a dangerous game to play?

AExpert Answer

Messing with nature is a very bad idea. Intervening in an intelligent, tested and proven way as we do with vaccines, medicines, controlled burns, creating natural parks, domesticating animals and creating new species of fruits and vegetables is what is required. Critics of GMO sometimes say we should not “play God”. But it is not the God part of the objection that worries me. We are not close to being smart enough or creative enough or even peaceful enough to engage that role. What we cannot have is “playing” or what you call "messing around." We need to closely regulate who can use GMO, when, where, why and with what penalties if they cause harms.

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