STUDY: Plant Breeding and Genetics

By Michael Stebbins • May 09, 2017

The following is a press release announcing a new research paper from the Council for Agricultural Science and Technology (CAST) on plant breeding and genetics. 

Many think it is time for another green revolution, one that utilizes technological innovation in smart, sustainable ways. Humans depend on plants for food, feed, fiber, and fuel--as well as less tangible aspects of life such as aesthetics and environmental stability. This paper is the first in a series that connects science and technology to agriculture, and it focuses on the critical importance of innovation in plant breeding to meet the challenge of providing food and nutritional security to humankind.

The ultimate goal of plant breeding is to develop improved crops through enhanced productivity, processing, marketing, and quality. The authors of this issue paper use science-based information and peer-review methods to establish the importance of plant breeding innovation, and they cover several key areas:

  • The science of plant breeding and genetics
  • The need for encouraging the next generation of scientists
  • The current role of government policy and regulations
  • The need for cooperation and collaboration at all levels, including the public-private nexus

The ultimate goal of plant breeding is to improve crop performance for traits or defined characteristics, and this paper outlines current practices and future developments--homozygous lines, phenotyping, hybridization, and many other scientific innovations. In our increasingly connected world, the process also includes computers, big data, and the transfer of technologies.

As the global nature of food security becomes more entwined, several key aspects of plant breeding take on increased importance: (1) government regulations need to be science-based, harmonious, and synchronous; (2) international trade is crucial to promote productivity and spread the benefits; (3) financial investment needs to come from all sectors; (4) common sense intellectual property protection will attract investors; (5) farmers must be actively involved in the implementation of the technology; and (6) consumers need to understand, trust, and accept their sources of food.    

According to most agriculturalists, investing in plant breeding is "growing our future." This paper provides factual information for the public and policymakers alike as the world faces an increased need for secure food. Game-changing crop technologies are an important part of the continued transformation to make agriculture a major contributor to ecosystem integrity while feeding the world. 

This CAST Issue Paper (IP57) and its companion Ag quickCAST are available online at the CAST website

Posted on February 2, 2018
A former response to a similar question answered by Dave Kovalic, Regulatory New Technology Lead at Monsanto, also provides information on scientific advancements and how they [Monsanto] affirm safety prior to targeted vector insertion.   “For context, it is important to recognize that random genome insertions have been naturally occurring in crops over the ~10,000-year history of agriculture.  In some crops, more than 90 percent of the genome consists of these... Read More
Posted on February 2, 2018
In terms of the science behind the technology to create GMOs, scientists have a much better understanding how a transgene is delivered and stably integrated into a chromosome (or genome). Many GMO products, such as Bt corn, were made using Agrobacterium cells to deliver useful trait genes into the plant cells. Scientists were able to dissect the different steps of this natural gene delivery system encoded by Agrobacterium. We now have a good understanding of the interactions between... Read More
Posted on January 2, 2018
Thank you for your questions, we would like to address these individually.   Why are GMOs created if scientists are not aware if it is really harmful? and Are GMOs really safe if you’re mixing to different DNA strands? yes GMOs are safe. In fact, according to this response, “the overwhelming consensus of scientific experts and major scientific authorities around the world, including the World Health Organization, Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, and... Read More
Answer:
STUDY: There Is “Little Doubt” About the Promised Bounty of Genetically Modified Crops
STUDY: The contribution of glyphosate to agriculture and potential impact of restrictions on use at the global level