Robert Murray, MD

Independent Expert

Robert Murray, MD

Professor, Human Nutrition, The Ohio State University

Dr. Bob Murray spent over 20 years in the field of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition. He is a professor in Human Nutrition at the Ohio State University. Bob has focused on pediatric obesity prevention, particularly in the areas of primary care and school policy. During his career, Bob worked as pediatric medical director at Abbott Nutrition and as director of the Center for Healthy Weight and Nutrition at Nationwide Children’s Hospital, offering medical and surgical weight management. Dr Murray served for ten years on, and is the past chair of, the American Academy of Pediatrics’ Council on School Health. Currently, he is the president-elect of the Ohio Chapter.

From this Expert

Posted on May 6, 2017
Response from Robert Murray, MD, Professor, Human Nutrition, The Ohio State University • August 10, 2017
A gene with a desirable trait can be moved from one organism to another organism as a means to change it. The traditional way is through selective breeding, which is slow, time consuming, inefficient, and transfers more than one gene, so other unexpected and unwanted traits can cause problems. But genes also can be moved in a laboratory, resulting in what has been called a genetically modified (“transgenic”) organism (GMO). GM technology moves only one gene, eliminating other,... Read More
Answer:
Posted on May 6, 2017
Response from Robert Murray, MD, Professor, Human Nutrition, The Ohio State University • August 10, 2017
A gene with a desirable trait can be moved from one organism to another organism as a means to change it. The traditional way is through selective breeding, which is slow, time consuming, inefficient, and transfers more than one gene, so other unexpected and unwanted traits can cause problems. But genes also can be moved in a laboratory, resulting in what has been called a genetically modified (“transgenic”) organism (GMO). GM technology moves only one gene, eliminating other,... Read More
Answer:
Posted on October 22, 2015
Response from Robert Murray, MD, Professor, Human Nutrition, The Ohio State University • January 29, 2016
The perspective posed by Ann Wigmore is too black and white to really reflect nutrition’s role in our well-being. Foods aren’t medicines; nor are they poisons. A quality food pattern is a necessary part of our daily needs.   We humans are omnivores, meaning that we eat practically anything, from grubs and insects to roots and seaweed. Sugars (honey) and salt have always been a prized item going back to our origins. Early humans ate meat, pounds of it per day, to get... Read More
Posted on December 10, 2014
Response from Robert Murray, MD, Professor, Human Nutrition, The Ohio State University • August 25, 2015
Genetic modification of plants and animals date back to the advent of farming and animal husbandry. It was done by identifying traits that were preferred and cross breeding. This is a hit-or-miss kind of approach. Although it transmitted the desired traits to the new crossbred plant or animal, it transmitted many other traits, as well. This scattershot approach to improving our crops and livestock was supplanted by the remarkable growth of the science of genetics.   Concerns over the... Read More
Posted on May 7, 2014
Response from Robert Murray, MD, Professor, Human Nutrition, The Ohio State University • August 28, 2015
GM crops have been shown to be as safe and nutritious as conventional varieties. How do we know?   Genetic modification involves moving a gene from one species into another species in order to add a beneficial trait. Plant scientists have learned how genes work, making it possible to identify the gene that codes for one specific, desirable trait and move it into a different plant. Although all living things look different to us, the DNA that makes up their genes all share the same basic... Read More
No Studies were Found.