Robert H. Poppenga, DVM, PhD, DABVT

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Robert H. Poppenga, DVM, PhD, DABVT

Professor of Clinical Veterinary Toxicology and Section Head, Toxicology Laboratory at the California Animal Health and Food Safety Laboratory (CAHFS), School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California at Davis

Dr. Robert Poppenga is Professor of Clinical Veterinary Toxicology and Section Head, Toxicology Laboratory at the California Animal Health and Food Safety Laboratory (CAHFS), School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California at Davis.  He has been at UCD since 2004.

He received his DVM and PhD degrees from the University of Illinois (Go Illini!).  He is board-certified by the American Board of Veterinary Toxicology and has served that organization in a number of roles including President.  He has almost 30 years of experience as a diagnostic veterinary toxicologist including previous faculty and diagnostic laboratory positions at Michigan State University and the University of Pennsylvania. He is author or co-author on over 150 scientific manuscripts and textbook chapters. 

He is active in a number of professional organizations including the American Association of Veterinary Laboratory Diagnosticians (former Executive Board member), the American Veterinary Medical Association (former member of the Committee on Environmental Issues), the American Association of Veterinary and Comparative Toxicology, the Society of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry, and the Society of Toxicology.

The Toxicology Laboratory at CAHFS is one of the busiest of its kind in the world and offers comprehensive diagnostic toxicology testing.  His research interests include diagnostic veterinary toxicology, wildlife toxicology, and development of biomarkers for chemical exposure.  He teaches veterinary toxicology to veterinary students at the School of Veterinary Medicine and advises Residents in diagnostic veterinary toxicology at CAHFS.

From this Expert

Posted on: April 20, 2018
Response from Robert H. Poppenga, DVM, PhD, DABVT, Professor of Clinical Veterinary Toxicology and Section Head, Toxicology Laboratory at the California Animal Health and Food Safety Laboratory (CAHFS), School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California at Davis • May 18, 2018
When glyphosate is applied to plants (e.g., crops or weeds) a certain percentage is absorbed and transported throughout the plant. The amount absorbed is variable depending on the application rate and the type of plant. Very little of the absorbed glyphosate is degraded by the plant and cannot be removed. Its persistence in plants is also variable. Federal regulatory agencies have established allowable limits for glyphosate residues in many different crops to protect human and animal health.... Read More
Answer:
No Studies were Found.