Peter J. Davies

Ambassador Expert

Peter J. Davies

Professor of Plant Physiology and International Professor of Plant Biology, Cornell University, Ithaca New York, USA

Peter J. Davies holds a B.Sc. and Ph.D. from the University of Reading in England, and an M.S. from the University of California at Davis. His expertise is in the field of plant development, especially plant hormones and crop biotechnology.

At Cornell he teaches plant function and growth, a course educating non-biology students in the societal implications of advances in biology, and a course on GM crops, their regulation and societal implications. He also holds the position of a Jefferson Science Fellow at the United States Department of State serving as a science advisor in the area of agricultural biotechnology.

From this Expert

Posted on January 22, 2015
Response from Peter J. Davies, Professor of Plant Physiology and International Professor of Plant Biology, Cornell University, Ithaca New York, USA • July 31, 2015
To address this multifaceted question we need to start with a consideration of types of pollination:            Open pollination is when a flower is pollinated by any other flower of the same species.  If there are separate male and female flowers all pollination is, by definition, open.  At the extreme, plants may be self-incompatible, such that if pollen is from another genetically-identical plant the pollen does not germinate, and... Read More
Posted on November 11, 2014
Response from Peter J. Davies, Professor of Plant Physiology and International Professor of Plant Biology, Cornell University, Ithaca New York, USA • August 1, 2014
What a great question! It even caused me to put down my breakfast of coffee and mixed GMO and non-GMO grain cereal. Note in passing that, worldwide, coffee is being devastated by coffee rust disease: resistance has been discovered, but one way to protect our crops from disease in the future will be biotechnology. An example of this is GMO blight-resistant chestnut, where a gene from wheat destroys the plant-damaging toxic chemical produced by the fungus, so rendering the tree disease-resistant... Read More
Posted on January 3, 2014
Response from Peter J. Davies, Professor of Plant Physiology and International Professor of Plant Biology, Cornell University, Ithaca New York, USA • December 3, 2013
Flavr-Savr tomatoes were developed to have a delayed over-ripening property so that they remained fresh in the retail trade for a longer period of time.  They have not been available since the 1990’s.  A blackening of the insides of tomato fruit is most likely blossom-end-rot occasioned by a deficiency of calcium during fruit development. When available, Flavr-Savr tomatoes were voluntarily labeled to inform consumers of the unique product benefits.
Posted on August 20, 2015
Response from Peter J. Davies, Professor of Plant Physiology and International Professor of Plant Biology, Cornell University, Ithaca New York, USA • April 11, 2014
Refereed literature compendia can be found at the following sources. A list of 610 scientific articles on safety assessments of foods and feeds derived from genetically modified crops (updated to June 2013) can be found at:http://chilebio.cl/documentos/Publicaciones.pdf. A list of 1,080 studies can be found at:http://www.biofortified.org/genera/studies-for-genera/. In Europe, a 2010 European Commission Directorate-General for Research assessed available regulatory science for... Read More
Posted on December 26, 2013
Response from Peter J. Davies, Professor of Plant Physiology and International Professor of Plant Biology, Cornell University, Ithaca New York, USA • March 4, 2015
Initially this question seems rather vague, but actually it is an excellent question from a person who is clearly thinking very carefully.  Essentially this is asking: How do we know who or what to believe, seeing that GMO advocates and opponents make very contrasting claims and each point to their own favorite pieces of evidence. There is no straight answer, and so I need to step through various levels or reasoning and evidence.  So let’s begin:   Anecdotes  ... Read More
No Studies were Found.