Michael Horak

Monsanto

Michael Horak

Weed Resistance Platform Lead, Monsanto Company

From this Expert

Posted on April 22, 2017
Response from Michael Horak, Weed Resistance Platform Lead, Monsanto Company • August 22, 2017
GMO plants, like all other plants, do not “sleep” in the sense that you and I as mammals sleep. However, plants do have natural processes that may be cyclic or seasonal, indicating a cycle or rhythm to their growth and life. This is not technically “sleeping” but let me give you a couple of examples of what I mean.    Some plants have a type of metabolism known as CAM (Crassulacean Acid Metabolism). Plants which have CAM close the pores on their leaves... Read More
Posted on November 30, 2015
Response from Michael Horak, Weed Resistance Platform Lead, Monsanto Company • February 5, 2016
Thank you for the question. Roundup Ready® crops (a brand name for some glyphosate-tolerant crops) have been enhanced through biotechnology to no longer be susceptible to glyphosate. Corn, soybean, cotton, canola, sugar beet and alfalfa are all examples of crops that have some glyphosate-tolerant varieties. Farmers use herbicides as one method to control weeds on their farms.    Methods that farmers use to control weeds include cultural control methods (e.g., growing a... Read More
Posted on August 6, 2014
Response from Michael Horak, Weed Resistance Platform Lead, Monsanto Company • November 25, 2014
This site has addressed human health in terms of herbicides, particularly glyphosate. Here is a little background on why herbicides are used; linked at the bottom are additional responses that discuss the safety profile of glyphosate in more detail.   I am not sure that people who speak about GMO crops actually “avoid” the fact that many herbicide-tolerant crops are in the marketplace. In fact, multiple herbicide-tolerant crops have been developed because of the challenge... Read More
Posted on June 2, 2014
Response from Michael Horak, Weed Resistance Platform Lead, Monsanto Company • January 23, 2015
In order for genes to move from one plant to another, cross pollination must occur.  Cross pollination among plants is a natural biological process that can occur between closely related plants. Generally, the more closely related two plant species are, the greater the chance that they can cross pollinate and hybridize with one another.  In rare cases cross pollination can occur between plants that are more distantly related (such as between different species, but almost never... Read More
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