QWhat is the Scientific definition of Organic Food?

What is the Scientific definition of Organic Food?

AExpert Answer

Actually, there is no scientific definition of organic food.  The National Organic Program (NOP) is a marketing program that certifies that the crop has been produced using a specific set of legally defined methods and products approved by that program. 

 

There are standards that must be followed in organic production.  These standards allow for the use of program-approved herbicides and pesticides, required certain agricultural practices be followed and require completion of a formal certification process to verify that the standards are followed.  You can see these at the website: 

http://www.ams.usda.gov/AMSv1.0/nop

 

In the United States, no food can be labeled "organic" unless it complies with the requirements of the NOP.  Qualified products can bear the "USDA Organic" seal.   It is a certification program only; there is nothing that you can measure to verify that it is organic.

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