Qwhat is the difference in price to buy GMOss to nonGMOs

what is the difference in price to buy GMOss to nonGMOs

AExpert Answer

This is always a challenging question to answer. The price difference between GMO and non-GMO varies from product to product and from one location to the next. The answer depends on what type of non-GMO product is being purchased. Most GMOs consumed are in the form of processed foods, it’s estimated that as much as 80 percent of processed foods include a GM ingredient. Let’s think of food prices like car prices. An automotive company offers a plain-Jane car at the lowest price, if the buyer wants additional features, then the price rises. Food products are similar. Food companies buy the highest quality ingredients they can for the lowest price possible, since GM crops are high yielding and high quality they food industry relies on them as standard ingredients where GMOs are available. If a company wishes to offer a non-GMO product, this is an additional feature which raises the cost, like automatic starters would be on a car.

 

So why is non-GMO an additional cost? There is no one answer. This can be due to fewer acres or higher costs of production, further transportation distances or costs, or perhaps a greater risk to produce. Typically, GM crops are the more efficient crops, and that means their price and costs as ingredients are less than non-GMOs. In the U.S., much of the sugar found in processed foods come from GM corn. If a food company wanted to use non-GMO sugar, there are fewer acres producing non-GM corn with lower yields, making ingredient price of the non-GMO sugar higher than GM corn sugar.

 

This is what makes it virtually impossible to describe in dollars or percentages, how much the price difference might be for each food. Price differences will be very specific to the product and the location.

Posted on June 13, 2018
The good news is that no genetically modified food has animal genes in it. There are currently only 10 crops that are developed with GM technology, they are - alfalfa, apples, canola, corn (field and sweet), cotton, papaya, potatoes, soybeans, squash and sugar beets. Alfalfa and feed corn are often fed to animals but all studies of dairy, eggs and milk from these animals has never found any indication of the GM feed, in other words, the animal digests that crop in the same manner as any other... Read More
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Posted on May 4, 2018
There would be more public seed development if genome editing technologies like CRISPR are not regulated as GMOs. Single point mutations are an extension of the undirected mutation breeding that is commonly used now. Having genome editing regulated like conventional plant breeding would allow university plant breeders to use the technology to develop new varieties without the stigmatism of them being GMOs. As for would it allow for more start-up seed companies, this is more doubtful. It is... Read More
Posted on May 4, 2018
There would be more public seed development if genome editing technologies like CRISPR are not regulated as GMOs. Single point mutations are an extension of the undirected mutation breeding that is commonly used now. Having genome editing regulated like conventional plant breeding would allow university plant breeders to use the technology to develop new varieties without the stigmatism of them being GMOs. As for would it allow for more start-up seed companies, this is more doubtful. It is... Read More

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