QThere are more and more countries beginning to ban gmos due to various reasons, cross pollination to natural crops, health risks and risk to the economy due to putting the small non gmo farmers out of business. How does Monsanto feel about this.

There are more and more countries beginning to ban gmos due to various reasons, cross pollination to natural crops, health risks and risk to the economy due to putting the small non gmo farmers out of business. How does Monsanto feel about this.

AExpert Answer

I have seen some quotes on the Internet that state, “In more than 60 countries around the world, including Australia, Japan, and all of the countries in the European Union, there are significant restrictions or outright bans on the production and sale of GMOs.”

The fact is that the number of countries that “ban” cultivation of GMOs is small. And many of those countries with limitations on GM planting still import significant amounts of food or feed that was produced from GM crops. (Check out the graphic on the “PUBLIC REVIEW” tab of this site to review detailed information on the status of GMO adoption worldwide.)


You’ll notice that several countries in the European Union (EU) have enacted bans on GMO cultivation, yet the EU Courts (both national and EU-wide) have consistently found that those bans are illegal since there is no scientific justification for the bans. Under EU law a ban can only be sustained if there is a scientific basis for harm. And, the few countries in the EU that have banned GM cultivation still import significant amount of food and feed derived from GM crops.

Here are a couple resources regarding Europe:

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