QGmos are not healthy and we dont want them on our food. Can you find something else ?

Gmos are not healthy and we dont want them on our food. Can you find something else ?

AExpert Answer

That's a very good question for me as a farmer who raises GM crops. If the market creates so much demand for something other than the GM corn and soybeans that I'm growing, then I'm sure farmers like me will choose to grow something else. But if you believe foods made with these crops aren't safe, then you have plenty of other options. Certified organic products are out there and are labeled so consumers can know they are buying foods raised under a certain set of rules for production. Voluntary non-GMO labels can be found as well. If people want to avoid GMO foods, then they can seek out these labels.

 

As far as safety goes, I don't happen to share your belief. Consumers do deserve choices and can demand them with their hard-earned dollars, but farmers deserve choices, too. Each farmer should have the freedom to farm how he or she chooses. Right now I'm choosing to use GM crops on most of my acres.

Posted on April 18, 2018
GMO Answers provides the facts that answer questions related to biotechnology, GM crops and agriculture. We work to ensure that the content and answers provided by experts and companies are accurate and therefore do not present opinions about GMOs, simply facts. GMO Answers is a community focused on constructive discussion about GMOs in order to have open conversations about agriculture and GMOs. This website is funded by the Council for Biotechnology Information. The Council... Read More
Posted on April 20, 2018
When glyphosate is applied to plants (e.g., crops or weeds) a certain percentage is absorbed and transported throughout the plant. The amount absorbed is variable depending on the application rate and the type of plant. Very little of the absorbed glyphosate is degraded by the plant and cannot be removed. Its persistence in plants is also variable. Federal regulatory agencies have established allowable limits for glyphosate residues in many different crops to protect human and animal health.... Read More
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Posted on January 31, 2018
Thank you for your question. There are various aspects of your question. I assume your question refers to the use of Agrobacterium rhizogenes by scientists to intentionally transfer genes from the bacterium to plants. Infection and DNA transfer from this bacterium occurs in nature all the time to cause disease. Such transformed plants are not classified as GMOs since transfer occurred naturally. If this is done by scientists then it would be classified as a GMO. Rules and... Read More
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