QGmos are not healthy and we dont want them on our food. Can you find something else ?

Gmos are not healthy and we dont want them on our food. Can you find something else ?

AExpert Answer

That's a very good question for me as a farmer who raises GM crops. If the market creates so much demand for something other than the GM corn and soybeans that I'm growing, then I'm sure farmers like me will choose to grow something else. But if you believe foods made with these crops aren't safe, then you have plenty of other options. Certified organic products are out there and are labeled so consumers can know they are buying foods raised under a certain set of rules for production. Voluntary non-GMO labels can be found as well. If people want to avoid GMO foods, then they can seek out these labels.

 

As far as safety goes, I don't happen to share your belief. Consumers do deserve choices and can demand them with their hard-earned dollars, but farmers deserve choices, too. Each farmer should have the freedom to farm how he or she chooses. Right now I'm choosing to use GM crops on most of my acres.

Posted on February 2, 2018
A former response to a similar question answered by Dave Kovalic, Regulatory New Technology Lead at Monsanto, also provides information on scientific advancements and how they [Monsanto] affirm safety prior to targeted vector insertion.   “For context, it is important to recognize that random genome insertions have been naturally occurring in crops over the ~10,000-year history of agriculture.  In some crops, more than 90 percent of the genome consists of these... Read More
Posted on February 2, 2018
In terms of the science behind the technology to create GMOs, scientists have a much better understanding how a transgene is delivered and stably integrated into a chromosome (or genome). Many GMO products, such as Bt corn, were made using Agrobacterium cells to deliver useful trait genes into the plant cells. Scientists were able to dissect the different steps of this natural gene delivery system encoded by Agrobacterium. We now have a good understanding of the interactions between... Read More
Posted on February 2, 2018
A former response to a similar question answered by Dave Kovalic, Regulatory New Technology Lead at Monsanto, also provides information on scientific advancements and how they [Monsanto] affirm safety prior to targeted vector insertion.    “For context, it is important to recognize that random genome insertions have been naturally occurring in crops over the ~10,000-year history of agriculture.  In some crops, more than 90 percent of the genome consists of these types... Read More