QDoes the GMO industry create jobs in agriculture?

Does the GMO industry create jobs in agriculture?

AExpert Answer

Agricultural biotechnology has created many thousands of well-paying jobs requiring advanced education and skills since from its R&D beginning back in the 1970s.  Thousands of Syngenta jobs are related to plant biotechnology—in R&D, regulatory, seed production, sales and more. In addition, the direct and indirect economic impact from the plant biotech industry as a whole is many times greater than that which directly involves the seed companies.

 

For context, consider that in 2013 a record 18 million farmers grew biotech crops. Remarkably over 90 percent, or more than 16.5 million, were small resource-poor farmers in developing countries. From 1996 to 2012, biotech crops increased crop production valued at US $116.9 billion and helped alleviate poverty for more than 16.5 million small farmers and their families totaling about 65 million people, who are some of the poorest people in the world.

 

A good example of job creation is the recent and ongoing expansion at RTP.

 

Syngenta currently employs 1,130 in North Carolina and have invested $94 million to expand its Syngenta Innovation Center, adding 200,000 square feet in laboratory and office space.  The expansion in Research Triangle Park will create 150 new research and development jobs ranging from plant scientists to information technology specialists by 2018.

 

Research at the site will focus on traits that can help crops better tolerate climate variability, combat plant stresses such as drought, and enhance productivity and plant performance. In addition to the current focus on corn, soybean, and sugar cane, research will be expanded to support other crops such as cereals, rice and vegetables.

 

- Currently Syngenta are actively hiring for 55 positions within the R&D and Biotechnology arena

- In 2013 Syngenta filled 416 positions including the following within R&D/Biotechnology:

  • 74 Biological Assessment
  • 16 Biotechnology
  • 8 Product Safety
  • 7 R&D Crops
Posted on July 21, 2017
Food production is affected by numerous factors, such as the amount of rain the crop receives, the quality of the soil, the number of weeds that compete for soil nutrients and moisture and the number of insects that feed on the crop. GMOs can’t address all of these factors, but they can address two important ones: weeds and insects.   Each weed that grows in a field takes soil nutrients and moisture away from a food plant. The more resources that are used by weeds, the less food... Read More
Posted on July 21, 2017
No single crop or food production method is capable of feeding the world on its own, so no, GMOs by themselves will not feed the world. However, as part of a global strategy to improve global food security, GMOs can have a tremendously positive contribution to feeding the world.   Current food production methods result in an estimated 800 million people being food insecure, with a further 1.2 billion not receive a sufficient level of nutritious food on a daily basis. The Food and... Read More
Posted on March 28, 2017
Thanks for the question, which I will address in two ways here.   1. What are three ways that organisms are modified by scientists? Here I will focus only on plants.   a. Agrobacterium: Agrobacterium tumefaciens (Agro) is a naturally occurring soil organism that causes a disease in plants called crown gall disease. In the late 1970s, Mary-Dell Chilton discovered that Agro actually transfers genes (DNA) from the Agro to the plant cell, where it becomes integrated into the plant... Read More

Explore More Topics