QDoes the GMO industry create jobs in agriculture?

Does the GMO industry create jobs in agriculture?

AExpert Answer

Agricultural biotechnology has created many thousands of well-paying jobs requiring advanced education and skills since from its R&D beginning back in the 1970s.  Thousands of Syngenta jobs are related to plant biotechnology—in R&D, regulatory, seed production, sales and more. In addition, the direct and indirect economic impact from the plant biotech industry as a whole is many times greater than that which directly involves the seed companies.

 

For context, consider that in 2013 a record 18 million farmers grew biotech crops. Remarkably over 90 percent, or more than 16.5 million, were small resource-poor farmers in developing countries. From 1996 to 2012, biotech crops increased crop production valued at US $116.9 billion and helped alleviate poverty for more than 16.5 million small farmers and their families totaling about 65 million people, who are some of the poorest people in the world.

 

A good example of job creation is the recent and ongoing expansion at RTP.

 

Syngenta currently employs 1,130 in North Carolina and have invested $94 million to expand its Syngenta Innovation Center, adding 200,000 square feet in laboratory and office space.  The expansion in Research Triangle Park will create 150 new research and development jobs ranging from plant scientists to information technology specialists by 2018.

 

Research at the site will focus on traits that can help crops better tolerate climate variability, combat plant stresses such as drought, and enhance productivity and plant performance. In addition to the current focus on corn, soybean, and sugar cane, research will be expanded to support other crops such as cereals, rice and vegetables.

 

- Currently Syngenta are actively hiring for 55 positions within the R&D and Biotechnology arena

- In 2013 Syngenta filled 416 positions including the following within R&D/Biotechnology:

  • 74 Biological Assessment
  • 16 Biotechnology
  • 8 Product Safety
  • 7 R&D Crops
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